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Full Lotus Posture and Energetic Meridians

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Posted (edited)

Several hours of standing has not been a problem and in general it gets better and better and easier as the energy moves well.

 

Highly recommend messaging the feet well and the toes and the end of the toes prior to Qi Gong and Standing Meditation.

 

Also - If during Standing Meditation or Qi Gong practice foot pain becomes high - take a quick break and message the feet, toes and heels - then continue.

Edited by Spotless
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Posted (edited)

Regarding the original post and the attached study:

 

It was not mentioned if the chair seated meditators were utilizing the backs of the chairs and no mention was made regarding the vigorous ness of the posture discipline.

 

Often chair seated meditators fall into a slouch and are simply relaxed and not in proper meditation posture.

 

Seated chair meditation is best on the forward edge of the chair and or if one starts a bit back as the meditation progresses one will naturally tend to move forward on the chair as posture becomes invigorated and energies are moving well.

 

In long chair seated meditations of 10 + hours the chairs back is generally not needed or touched. 

One is very upright.

 

Most practitioners such as those mentioned do not meditate in a chair seated position regularly  - but we can certainly assume that most do sit in chairs regularly to relax and or work.

 

Many seasoned meditators sitting in chairs will actually slouch somewhat when asked to close their eyes and meditate at a lecture/satsang. Few sit up into good posture.

 

I am not arguing here that in fact the Lotus would not do what is being stated to a greater degree than sitting in a chair - certainly in such very short intervals as in this study.

 

 

Edited by Spotless
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We have a modified version of the taijiquan single forms and neigong sets for folks who are unable to stand (injured etc). The main thing is to sit on chairs with flat seats and a straight back with no armrests. The same forms can also be done seated (cross-legged) on the ground or a meditation cushion as well. Key is to maintain the crown point suspension and a relaxed and straight back/spine. 

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23 hours ago, Spotless said:

In so far as regarding meditation and its highest forms - lotus is unnecessary and completely non-essential.

+1 

In fact, the main requirement for meditation and samādhi is "sukhāsana" (or comfortable posture), which is essentially the everyday, run-of-the-mill, humble criss-cross-apple-sauce posture :)

 

 

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https://terebess.hu/zen/mesterek/Tao-Longevity-by-Huai-Chin-Nan.pdf

 

So Master Nan, Huai-chin explains how the full lotus posture works in meditation:

 

Quote

After freeing  the legs and waiting until the tingling and numbness have subsided or abated, one feels a kind of euphoria never before experienced. If you persist in meditating until your ch'i and blood flow freely to your legs, you will have a strong internal orgasm from your feet and legs upward to your waist and back, and even throughout your entire body. Rest assured. You would then not want to release your legs and stop your meditation prematurely.

 

I think it's pretty obvious that "lack" of full lotus meditation is quite the norm in the Westernized modern world.

But the arguments FOR practicing full lotus are not as well known.

 

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