Recommended Posts

I would like to open a discussion on the topic of 'Which other Qigong or Neigong systems employ a breath sequencing method similar to GM Doo Wai's Flying Phoenix system, and how does this actually work?'.

Having actually practiced this system now for the past year or so, I see similarities with certain types of pranayama exercises. From my personal experience, I find that once one has started integrating these breath control sequences, there seems to be an effect on other practices. Despite being, for the most part, a healing art, one effect seems to be the ability to spontaneously enter samadhic meditative states. What I would like to know is why certain systems warn against the use of such breath sequencing or breath control, and precisely what is taking place energetically, physiologically and on more subtle levels? Sifu Dunn claims that it is possible to achieve awakening simply by practicing the Flying Phoenix system. I wonder if this is an accurate statement, and to what extent - if possible to actually awaken in this way - the specific breath sequencing might contribute to this state?

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good timing because I was thinking of creating a similar topic a while ago.

 

Which type of pranayama exercises are you referring to? I would love to learn more.
 

Sifu Terry has written following:

 

Quote

Each FP Qigong meditation will impart its health, energizing, rejuvenating benefits regardless of how you focus your mind so long as you hold the posture, do the breath control sequence and the movements (if there are movements) correctly. 

 

This remarkable aspect of Flying Phoenix Qigong is what sets it apart form every other Qigong method that I know about.

 

This got me wondering how does the mind training aspect work in other breath sequence systems. Are they completely permissible like the description above or do most systems require some specific focus? Leif shared that in Sunn Yee Gung its training requires developing listening skills which implies purposeful mindfulness or awareness development.

 

There are different things referred to as the awakening in spiritual context. Speaking from the Buddhist perspective of awakening, it requires the development of insight. I am not sure if the Flying Phoenix or samadhic meditations are conductive for that as stand alone practices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/23/2018 at 6:25 PM, virtue said:

Good timing because I was thinking of creating a similar topic a while ago.

 

Which type of pranayama exercises are you referring to? I would love to learn more.
 

Sifu Terry has written following:

 

 

This got me wondering how does the mind training aspect work in other breath sequence systems. Are they completely permissible like the description above or do most systems require some specific focus? Leif shared that in Sunn Yee Gung its training requires developing listening skills which implies purposeful mindfulness or awareness development.

 

There are different things referred to as the awakening in spiritual context. Speaking from the Buddhist perspective of awakening, it requires the development of insight. I am not sure if the Flying Phoenix or samadhic meditations are conductive for that as stand alone practices.

Thank you Virtue, however I would just like to mention that I started this thread rather than contribute to this thread: 

in which they seem to be taking much the same direction as it appears you would like this topic to follow. I do very specifically want to discuss what I wrote as a header to the topic, namely 'Breath Sequencing in Neigong systems'. 

 

Regarding which pranayama exercises I was alluding to, they were part of the Kriya Yoga teachings, and I would prefer not to discuss these exercises. I only mentioned them as a reference, because they involve a breath control method, which is basically what pranayama is, in one sense. I really don't want to get into the Kundaliniyoga aspects of such practices, even though this may be a part of the FPCK system. I just feel that this particular topic has been done to death in so many threads, that it is pointless allowing this thread to veer off in that direction.

 

I believe that what sets the FPCK system apart, even from Sunn Yee Gong and other components of GM Doo Wai's family arts, is the fact that it was ostensibly received from a goddess by a form of direct transmission, and was specifically for healing. Historically it was not originally part of the family system, so it may well be that other elements of the style require a different mindset, involving different forms of contemplation and mindfulness. I don't know, because I only practice FPCK for the time being. Most of us are also aware that there are also what Sifu Dunn refers to as 'supplementary exercises' which GM Doo Wai uploaded to Youtube some time ago, and these also employ the same breath sequencing.

 

But from even the short time I have been practicing (a year or so), I can certainly echo Sifu Dunn's comments regarding the Samahdic states which this practice enables or induces, seemingly spontaneously. I would like to know how much of this 'blissful' state is directly attributable to the breath sequencing, and what the effects of and purposes for breath sequencing are in other styles - if they exist. If I am not mistaken, Sunn Yee Gong also makes use of breath sequencing? 

Bear in mind that the terminology you and several others on the FPCK thread are using is Buddhist, whereas the system is definitively Daoist in origin. I don't deny that there may be cross-overs and parallels to be drawn between the two systems, but the attitude toward self-realization/awakening is not one of these in my opinion. To summarize, the Buddhist goal of awakening is the Daoist point of departure. Sifu Dunn has stated on several occasions that the correct practice of the FPCK system can lead to full awakening, so if this is correct, then it can be considered a stand-alone enlightenment practice - and I certainly hope that this is true!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites