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Found 66 results

  1. Greetings Beautiful Bums

    Greetings to you and thank you for this moment. I am real glad to have found this well of knowledge. My name is Lydia Rosa and I am interested in knowledge. I found this forum as I googled yin and yang as I am inclined to gather more data on the subject for practical purposes. I am astonished by the words I found and truly yearning to take part in the very stimulating discussions I found. With respect and love Lydia Rosa
  2. Intro

    Hello Friends, This is my first post. I wanted to join thedaobums in the hope of possibly making some new friends and contacts, as well as engage in some good discussions about the site's many interesting topics. I've been a "lurker" for a while, and I have found this forum to be the most dynamic, eclectic and diverse of the several that I have belonged to which deal with related topics (dharmawheel and some esoteric forums). Anyway, my background is itself eclectic, and I'm increasingly having a difficult time fitting myself into a label, without, at the same time, being able or desirous of "rejecting" anything that I may have identified with in the past. On the whole, I think this is a good thing, as I see a major goal of the spiritual path as being able to transcend labels and "identities." At the same time, I'm finding it quite uncomfortable. It's like a man having 3 or 4 families which don't know or acknowledge each other, each of whom he loves deeply as "part of himself"; he is unable to live with any of them all the time, but unable to part with any of them in an absolute sense; at the same time, he has a sense that what he is truly seeking lies outside the very category of "family" (if this metaphor makes sense). With this in mind, I'm reluctant to call myself a "Buddhist," or "not a Buddhist," a "Christian," or "not a Christian," a "Taoist," or "not a Taoist," etc. Over the past five years, I've been deeply immersed in the Western Esoteric Tradition, particularly centred around the ideas of Renaissance magi such as Agrippa, Dee, Bruno, the Rosicrucians, as well as Swedenborg, Boehme and the (non-Blavatskian) Western Theosophical tradition, while also finding many limitations in their points of view and needing to supplement this with study of the more metaphysical traditions of the East--Buddhism, Taoism and Trika Shaivism. But then increasingly I can't find what I'm seeking in any one of these traditions to the exclusion of others. I see them all, perhaps, as "upayas": skillful means to lead deluded beings to liberation. Despite all the arguments I have read and participated in over the philosophical subtleties of what precisely this "liberation" entails, I still naturally incline to this general universalistic view. I'm fond of Crowley (again while acknowledging his limitations), and I think that he was on to something (inspired) by his realization that one needed to break through externally imposed labels, restrictions, and identities and discover one's own "Holy Guardian Angel" in order to truly move forward. I think he was mistaken on many levels, but this idea that one needs to, as it were, make one's own tradition (in his case, Thelema) rings true for me, personally. If one doesn't, one is more or less the victim of centuries/millennia of historical and scholastic traditions which may have nothing to do with one's real quest. I know how much he suffered (and made others to suffer) in pursuing this ideal, however. Still, in a sense I consider myself a "independent Thelemite"--"independent" because I do not consider AC's personal revelations, mythos or ideas regarding the different Aeons (interesting as they may be) as binding on anyone other than himself. I think it could be argued that there is a "thelema," properly understood, hidden within each if the world's great religious/spiritual traditions, including Christianity and Islam (vide Corbin). I also disagree with Crowley regarding the importance of compassion and even pity; the Bodhisattva ideal is one of the most noble and glorious conceptions that I am aware of. Practically, I have more and more withdrawn from outward religious rites and turned towards silent, objectless meditation. The other, more active side of my spiritual practice involves Bardonian Hermetics, and a sort of streamlined angelic theurgy. Still, I feel like I've been stagnating for some time and I feel a strong need to break new ground. This is why I have increasingly turned towards the possibilities of astral projection (or "journeying") as a means of contacting higher Wisdom beings to help me move forward. My abilities are still weak at best. In this connection, the recent discovery of Qigong and energy work in general has been a great help. I never talk about this stuff to anyone. The anonymity of this site encourages me to share in the hope of finding like minded fellow-travelers. This is the reason I have written this long and regrettably egotistical post. I am what we might call "esoterically isolated," outwardly living a workaday life with a family, and without any associates beyond two or three distant contacts. I got "burned out" long ago on spiritual organazations and groups, and prefer the way of the hermit, at least until circumstances shift and other possibilities arise (I can't rule it out). Still, I am looking forward to hopefully learning and sharing whatever I can with friends here. Thanks :-)
  3. Anti-aging Sages

    Please post people that are great examples of health and long life. let me start it off with this: The Healthiest Old Person on the Planet Explains How to Stay in Shape Charles Eugster, 96, is a runner, body-builder, public speaker, writer, rower, and wakeboarder. He also claims to be so healthy that his formerly grey pubes have turned brown again. By Matt Blake Apr 11 2016, 7:40am ShareTweet CHARLES EUGSTER POSING WITH HIS WORLD ROWING MASTERS TROPHY. ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHARLES EUGSTER Charles Eugster is the greatest British sprinter you've probably never heard of. He currently holds world records in the 200m (indoor) and 400m (outdoor) sprints, as well as British records in the 60m (indoor), 100m (outdoor), and 200m (outdoor). A couple of weeks ago, he narrowly missed out on the world record for the 60m sprint after pulling his hamstring halfway through. He still won the race to become European Champion. It's an impressive record, given that the man—by pretty well established standards—shouldn't be able to cross a road without help, let alone run. He is 96 years old. The London-born ex-dentist, who now lives in Switzerland, is arguably the fittest senior citizen on the planet. He's also a body-builder, a public speaker, a writer, a rower, a wakeboarder, an entrepreneur, and a budding fashion designer, planning his own line in elderly couture. But more than anything, he is a professional death defier who hasn't just slowed the ravages of aging, but reversed them all together: where once white pubic hairs grew, he says, brown ones now flourish. This was, of course, quite tricky to independently verify when I rang him up recently. CHARLES WAKEBOARDING VICE: Hi Charles. Congratulations on the over-nineties 60m European title. Were you disappointed not to get the world record? Charles Eugster: Oh, very. The thing was, I felt absolutely great before the race and was in my youthful dreams with hopes of attacking the world record of 14.28 seconds. I flew out of the blocks and, after the first 30m, I was out in front of the pack. That's when my hamstring tore. You see, I was against the most extraordinary people: a 90-year-old German and a 99-year-old Italian. I knew they were quick, but I'd left them miles behind. Then, as the leg pain set in, they started to catch me. I was scared stiff that they would beat me, but of course they didn't. I staggered over the line within over 18 seconds. Nowhere near the record. Now I must stop training for a month. Sprinting—or body-building, for that matter—are not things one normally associates with old people. Why? I was 87 and realized my body was deteriorating. I had a muffin-top waist and my muscles were getting weaker and weaker. I felt so old. But because I was so vain, I didn't like the idea of it at all. So I joined a body-building gym and employed a personal trainer who was a Mr. Universe to rebuild my body from scratch. Nine years on, at 96, do you feel old now? Not at all. I feel like a youngster of 60, tops. Being fit is a wonderful thing. Before I turned 90, I got severe colds every November, but now they've completely stopped—I've had two in six years. I'll tell you something else: strength training increases your libido. And you know this from experience? Well, you know the story about my pubic hair, don't you? I feel like I'm about to. When I was still training with Mr. Universe, he took me aside one day and asked, "Have you noticed an increase in your libido?" I was embarrassed. I said, "Look, this is not something I'd like to discuss. It's private." But he was very persistent, and in the end I relented. I said, "Look now, you mustn't tell anybody else, but what I'm about to tell you is very dramatic. Incredible. Since I started on this program, my pubic hairs, which were white, have turned brown." I mean, wow! So you've literally reversed the process of aging. Yes! You see, the stupid thing is that people don't realize that you can have a beach body at 90 and turn the heads of the sexy 70-year-old girls on the beach. I am living proof that, if you eat right and exercise properly, you can be that guy at any age. What do you eat to stay in shape? Variety is key. I start every day with a protein shake because, as you get older, your protein synthesis no longer functions as well. I avoid sugar and eat lots of meat, especially fat. I've been on a fat trip lately. Fat! Piles of fat. Yet, I was in a supermarket the other day and was perplexed to find yogurt with zero fat. What on earth is that? The idea of the nutrition pyramid where, at the top, is a little fat and meat, and at the bottom a lot of carbohydrates, is, excuse me, bullshit. Humans are so unbelievably stupid that we have begun to tinker with food. Our theories of nutrition have resulted in a pandemic of obesity. Can you imagine a hunter-gatherer enjoying a low-fat yogurt? Let me tell you this, too: I read a report recently which said that a fatty diet also increases your libido. I know you sadly lost your second wife, Elsie, 15 years ago. But with all this talk of libido, are you looking for love? Yes. But the only problem is that I seem to be so busy with so many other things I don't have an enormous amount of time. I'm registered with a dating agency, but all they can produce are young things of about 70! Above 70 there's nothing. Why is that, do you think? Because people of 70 to 100 years old are absolutely the lost population. We are ignored by society, by medicine, by research. And we can't get a job. Nobody cares about us. I'll give you one silly example: there are no training plans, or gyms, for anybody over 70, as there are in Japan. The way we treat the elderly today is disgraceful. And don't even get me onto retirement. What about retirement? Retirement is the biggest killer of old people, full stop. I prefer to call it involuntary unemployment. What I'm nearly bursting a blood vessel about is the fact that humans are blissfully ignoring the aging process. We recycle everything nowadays, except human beings. Our expiry date is 65, after which we're thrown on the rubbish heap and chemically treated. We are pouring the experience, creativity, and talent of people over 65 down the toilet. They should be able to found companies, be creative. They have nothing to do except sit about and get sick. This is a world problem and it needs to change. What's your answer? PUT. OLD. PEOPLE. TO. WORK! One of the things I want to do is set up a retraining program for older people. I'd like to see companies set up in old people's homes that offer, say, computer services. For example, if I want to find out something, the computer is a wonderful thing, but sometimes it takes a while to find [what you're looking for]. Now, if I could call up an old people's home and say, "I want this information by that time," if they have 50 old people working on computers, one of them is bound to come up with something. Like a sort of elderly IT sweatshop? [Laughs] Well, we'd pay them properly, obviously. It could be transcriptions, or research, anything. Hidekichi Miyazaki, the 105-year-old runner Charles wants to challenge You've seen a world war, a Cold War, the Great Depression, and god knows how many financial crises, not to mention all the good things that have happened since you were born in 1919. What's the one piece of advice you'd give to young people today? Explore your talents and never stop learning. In your lifetime you will not have one job, but you will have a huge number of different jobs in different areas. We are at the very beginning of the digital age, of which nobody really knows the consequences. Oh, and don't get too wrapped up in the culture of youth. Youth is so fantastic, but we should be impressing on people how wonderful, stupendous, exciting, and amazing old age can be, too. Oh, exercise and eat lots of fat. You know why! What else is on your bucket list? I want to change the world. I'm writing a book called 97 and Loving It, which I hope to publish this year. Then I want to establish fitness centers for those over 70 and start a job creation company to retrain older people. Then, of course, I want to have some connection with nutrition for the old. And the other thing in the back of my mind is that I would like to create a fashion label for older people. Because the way that older people dress is absolutely disgusting. I don't just want a label, I want a whole conglomerate. And what about your sprinting? Well, once this hamstring heals, I think we'll see what can be done about the 100m outdoors. There's a 105-year-old Japanese sprinter called Hidekichi Miyazaki who I would like to run against over 100m. They call him "The Golden Bolt," and with our combined ages of over 200 years, I think that would be some spectacle!
  4. Today I found myself contemplating Tao, neutrality and perspective. It seems our conditioned minds are constantly looking to establish a position to hold on too. For example - "I accept this, I reject this. I surrender myself to you, I close myself to you. I embrace life, I despise life. Things should be this way, things should be that way. This person is a Master, this person isn't..." In this thread, I just wanted to venture the thought that to embrace Tao, we don't need to establish anything. By not establishing anything, we are free to simply respond as natural beings. In other words, to embrace Tao, we simply learn to be neutral. By being neutral, we respond outside of conditioning, naturally and gracefully. We learn to move without the constant pressures and demands of our minds When we operate from a conditioned perspective, we inevitably draw conclusions. These conclusions greatly simplify things for us, but at the same time they take away from our curiosity. Neutrality usually gets a bad rap. It seems to be the weakest option out there. It can't satisfy the hunger of the mind in its quest for exactness. It is also the lowest number 0. It is also like admitting "I don't know". But I was thinking today, that neutral doesn't mean indifferent or inactive. Neutral doesn't mean passive or weak. Neutral simply means reacting naturally with intelligence. That's why I used the word "respond" instead of "react". To me, Tao is returning to the all-embracing innocent mind of a child. The original mind of a child is "0". Such a mind is curious, elastic and flexible. It doesn't try to elevate itself, it is content with being 0. It doesn't draw conclusions. A tree is not a noun to a child, it is a living thing, it can even change. Sometimes we even forget that people can change.
  5. Want To Play?

    There is a game. There's a game being played. Players play it using pieces and boards. Everyone plays it. And even though not everyone actively plays... everyone is involved. Everything is involved. Everything is game. Even non things. Default. The game excluding none, is utterly and wholly, entirely all inclusive. All pieces, all Players, playing or not are part of the game... as is The Board. As to Players and Pieces, there seems some ambiguity. There seems no agreement on whether Pieces are just pieces, or if some pieces are Players, or if Players are Pieces, or if players use pieces to Play... the rules aren't cut in stone you see. But the game is very clear. everything is game. Even the box is part of the game, it's in the rules... i think. The Rules: There is no book of The Rules. Although there are many books about rules. The Rules are entirely implicit, revealed most clearly when broken. Never explicit. And prone to regular shift. It seems. Any rule broken is penalized, but there are other rules for how much penalty, how often and for how long. It also seems there is no agreement among Players as to The Rules about the penalizing of broken rules. One thing is certain though, every broken rule is penalized, (even if only through praise). The Rules are most vividly unveiled only when broken. There are layers of rules and there are even Rules for The Rules. Some of the rules, while seemingly discoverable and understandable to an extent, are rarely conveyable in a manner capable of insighting lasting agreement among all players. It also seems an axiom that whenever some aspect of the rules seems to be explicitized and concretized, explainable by a player, new aspects of the rule become unveiled, often revealing the former rule's irrelevance. All rules seem prone to shift, subtle and radical, without signal or forewarning. As do the pieces... and the players come to think of it. Indeed, a definitive knowable, concrete source for having them explained to one outright, in no uncertain terms, is perhaps the rarest thing imaginable. The one impossible thing? Many people claim to know the rules. Many people will tell you the rules. Some seek to enforce them. Some try to follow them. Some rules i break, others i seem to break upon. Some follow some of them... some of the time. Some by trying and some accidentally find they follow them. Though they are broken in precisely the same manner... Some rely on them, others revile them. Disagreement over them seems one of the few truly unifying principles among Players and Pieces alike. The Board: There is a board for the game. It's huge. vast. As unimaginable as it is palpable. Beautiful, and Terrible. It's beyond reckoning. Literally. And yet, much of the board seems concrete. Players move about the board. Players meet on the board. Pieces are moved by players and by... the board? Players who are pieces, interact with pieces and players and Pieces who are Players... players encountering the rules... playing the game. To some players, the board is also a player. To others, the board is a dull box of rocks... more rules it seems. Clever buggers... into everything. The board is so vast because it's comprised of... other boards. Each piece of the game brings its own board to the game. Each player has a board as well, or is a board... i forget... Bit of a grey area, if players are boards as well as players... Have to check the rules... All boards comprise 'The Board' and 'The Board' shifts with the rules players and pieces. Among all this inherent implicitness, there arises and abides a sense of pattern among the board and playerpieces... in the playing of the game. Players refer to the patterns arising... it seems central to the play. Patterns: comforting, familiar, terrifying, auspicious, awe=inspiring, and all encompassing. Though The Board embodies an ambiguity that abides, no matter how many patterns arise, and agreement flies whenever explicit descriptions of the board are claimed or championed. so... there's a game. are you playing?
  6. Change the world now

    Who else is just tired of the nonsense of the world? By non-sense, I mean the non sensical system that we are slaves to that feeds off of us... the entire global financial system. I'd like to find a way to live outside of it, maybe plant a seed to change it someday. Could it be possible if some of us started to exclusively live off the land? " When the tao is lost, there is goodness. When goodness is lost, there is morality. When morality is lost, there is ritual. Ritual is the husk of true faith, the beginning of chaos."
  7. what is human?

    Here's a fun musing that settles on my thought pond from time to time. It arose again rather insistently this morning and I felt like sharing the process with words. Nothing serious in it, though it is sincere. I'm endlessly curious... what makes me human? Where exactly 'in me' is the 'human bit'? This usually plays out about the same, and I've shared it before, but da Bums has shifted and so I feel like sharing again and seeing what comes of it. so: what is human? I'm re-minded that while seemingly being human, no where inside this body, do I encounter the human element. Not even in my very human DNA, not even in that which is unique only to humans do I find the human element, for even my DNA forms of the same elements as the rest of the manifest universe. I'm re-minded that what I used to think of as my solid human body. Seems a fluid, ever-shifting collection of several trillion independently identifiable small life forms, each themselves comprised of the same elements as the rest of the universe. These life forms arise naturally and self arrange without thought, or command, (indeed often in spite of thought and command), into various patterns that results in what I refer to as my human body. and yet... human is what? when does the human bit come into it? I'm re-minded that, that which seems to distinguish me from all else in the universe, my body, seems to be a pattern of elements. One pattern among myriad. A pattern comprised and arranged in the shape of what my mind refers to as human, comprised of many other patterns called organs, limbs, etc. The same elements arranged into another form, in varying amounts, is recognizable as not human. I'm re-minded that, that which comprises the body, which is similar to the rest of the universe, is all of it; while that in the body which is different from the rest of the universe, is none. That seems really significant. No where is body comprised of that which the rest of the universe is not. So when is a pattern of elements human? Human city, human art, human music, human politics, human clothing. I'm re-minded that the core of all manifest elements seemingly so solid and permanent... are temporary and comprised of vibration, resonance and emptiness. Thus it seems my human body, is an expression of the vibration of inherent emptiness, resonating as elements arranging in layers of patterns distinguishable as a human typing figures on a screen, with far more in common with distant black holes than is dissimilar. how bout that? whew. it's rather staggering at times... like now. funny too, how it's always been now, I've never been me in the past, or the future. i am only now. every human experience now. each human experience memory, re-membered now. each fantasy of the future, in mind now. and all the while, awareness underlying each individual cell, aware to sit as this, body in a chair and simply be... such a miracle is this?! how many miracles in a yard of common earth? in a 'human' eye? in a thought? What a miracle to just sit here and be, as this moist spec of dust I sit upon, simultaneously spins about itself, orbiting a rather common yellow ball of light, itself corkscrewing through the galaxy... one pattern amid myriad... ever unfolding... fluid, never static, inherently empty, yet expressing form so generously. I'm reminded of the arms of galaxies, in the spiral of my son's ear. and i'm re-minded of that in mind. where is this mind? what is mind? what is human?
  8. The mysteries of a woman;s heart

    So many things change over the centuries. There is a constant though: No matter how pragmatic the female human species may be, they will often truly love someone that, in all appearances, are beneath them. To the salvation of many of us males. To the mysteries of the female heart and my wife on her 58th birthday.
  9. My newcomer post

    Namaste friends, I have had this site bookmarked for a couple years and come here sometimes to read, tho recently had the urge to be more involved, so I made my account and am making this post now in the Newcomer section. What got me into Taoism was my instructor for Yellow Dragon Kung fu, he recommended some books on Taoist philosophy, and from there I had read more books and resonated with their content. Some of the books I like are the following: The Chronicles of Tao 365 Tao Fourth Uncle in the Mountain Bones of the Master Enter Mo Pai etc. Some of these books may not fall into the strict genre of Taoism (tho technically we can say everything falls into Taoism...) I got similar stories and vibes from all of these books, however. I look forward to discussing these subjects with all of you! Eternal Love & Light, Arya
  10. New User Old Seeker

    Hi Dao Bums I practice meditation, energy work, healing sounds, have studied Tai Chi, QiGong, chanting, and have attended many and various workshops/conferences/retreats. I have been actively involved in spiritual seeking since the age of 13 . I like neuroscience principles (coming from books like "The Craving Mind," "Mindsight," and "Aware") to articulate Daoist principles/the Tao. In kindness, NeuroscienceAndDao
  11. Hello DoaBums

    Hi my name is Joe I am a person who likes to meditate and come here to further my knowledge and help contribute where I can. Hope to see you around the forum. Talk to me...
  12. Mysterious Pass

    voided- my apologies
  13. Hello forum!

    I reading Mantak Chia book but after I will learn from book I want to read and be interested in his literature and taoism
  14. A Shamatha Meditation Based on Symbolism, Visualization, Mnemonics and Classical Conditioning. This 3-level meditation method is based on pure psychology and a completely rational method to develop focus, objectivity, discipline, inner purification, a desire for liberation, inner stillness, understanding ‘destructive normality’, and a preparedness to walk on the path of spirituality. You can read the disclaimers given at the top to understand the objective of the meditation: https://nellaishanmugam.wordpress.com/a-shamatha-meditation-based-on-symbolism-visualization-mnemonics-and-classical-conditioning/
  15. So I was thining about the type of faith it's required to have to literally be like Jesus.. Then I came across the idea that there are many types of faith, in multiple religions.. each type of faith is a bit different.. There is faith in your fellow man.. Faith in ideals, ideas and in goodness in general.. There of course is the opposite type of faith.. which is in Evil.. dictators, unholymen.. the idea of survival of the fittest.. For example that cute lamb dies to a Lion.. The laws of nature and the circle of life! I think Taoism is mostly about that circle of life.. Finding and sensing the way in everything.. and is a stable for good ethics.. But I've never heard of a Taoist that can perform miracles. But one would assume that miracles too have a root in the Tao.. or that the Tao is the miracle itself..!! So what do you guys think of faith in anywhere it can be applied.. and specfically being a Taoist and what role faith plays in your life..?
  16. Introduction

    Hello everyone, my name is metabee17 and I'm interested in lots of the topics in this forum.
  17. I have been a student of the Daodejing for many years. My study has largely consisted of reading various translations and interpretations of DDJ and reflecting on its meanings. I think this is the way many of us have started with Daoism. As I read the various translations and interpretations of DDJ, I began to see the influences that the writers had on rendering the work; their point of view, as it were. As must be the case, these points of view are decidedly western, and quite often Christian. Even the more scholarly efforts, in spite of best intentions, often contain traces of western and Christian thinking. Being aware of this, you can recognize it and make what ever accommodations you feel inclined. Still, I began to suspect that some publications were actually more interpretations than translations, particularly the less scholarly ones. Researching the background of the writers, particularly their ability with written and spoken Chinese, and reviewing the bibliographies of their works, helps in sensing how much more a work is of interpretation than translation and the amount of value you can place on the work. This has led me to question how informed the translations are ... or rather, how the translations were informed? What, beyond ability with the Chinese language is necessary to translate a work like the DDJ. Knowledge of Chinese culture, as a matter of general understanding, certainly contributes to translation, as does understanding of Chinese history. Even so, as I read the various DDJs, I still struggled with the seemingly enigmatic language and symbolism of the translated text, despite having tried to select works of knowledgeable translators. Many translators don't provide much explanation. Simply relying on the truthful feel of the DDJ, however strong, was not developing my understanding. I just felt the need for a more appropriate and specific context in which to make sense of the DDJ. Something that might make the DDJ more actionable in terms of practice of the ideas put forward. To that end, I began to look at translations of other source texts. Certainly, there is no shortage of references to such texts, particularly in the more scholarly translations. I settled on two such works that have opened up for me a whole different level of understanding of the DDJ; The Seal of the Unity of the Three by Fabrizio Pregadio and The Thread of Dao by Dan G Reid. It is with this backdrop that I start this thread. I am not a scholar or academic but simply one on the journey, seeking to share my impressions. My hope is that others, familiar with these works or not, will share their ideas as well. So, initially, what do the Bums think of these two works in general and how have you used them? btw, this is my first attempt to initiate a thread. If I am violating and rules, customs or conventions, please let me know. ; )
  18. Tai Chi and Tango

    Please start at 2:56
  19. Hello I am a new :)

    Hi all I am very happy to be here but I am full of questions and doubts. I was hoping someone can help me on this journey. 1) Where should I start? 2) How do I cultivate Jing, chi and shen? 3) Do I have to be celibate? 4) If I am sexually active, can I still conserve my Jing? How? 5) Where do I find a Master to learn from? Does it has to be in person or can it be online? 6) I live in New Zealand, anyone here as well? As you can see I am very lost, any help would be greatly appreciated! Thank you
  20. Why live a Virtuous life?

    Hello, if anybody can assist in my understanding of why someone would want to live a life by virtues vs a non-virtuous life? Sure it would benefit those around you, though why bare the suffering of living that life? What I am saying, if 'one' is suffering leading a non-virtuous life and essentially living a life by doctrine to virtues is a form of suffering anyway is there a logical reason for choosing that as a path? thank you
  21. Ni hao, Dao Bum, my story is a simple one but one I have never attempted to form into words. I was always into the martial arts, this proved a soft entrance to the Eastern spiritual traditions and forms of internal cultivation. Through meditation, qigong, tai chi and study within Mandarin, I found myself constantly staring into the eyes of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. I picked up a book from Barnes & Nobles that was a five book volume of the Chinese classics, which had a book from each school of thought. Lao Tzu's "Tao Te Ching" (Dao De Jing), was the one that rang so clearly to me despite it's mysterious and often purposely confusing style of writing. It's a format that allowed me to find what I needed throughout various points in my life, the Tao Te Ching was a book of sage advice. However my thirst for more Taoist knowledge had only just begun. I began to read more and more, with each book, a new outlook on life and how to find my inner nature and become like the "uncarved block" (p'u). I delved deep into my studies; finding myself during the Spring and Autumn period history and writing's about Taoist philosophy and as far as modern Taoist sorcery, alchemy, divination, immortality, etc. They each provided an inkling into the mind of the Taoist throughout the many years. With peaceful hermit's like Lao Tzu, to radical extremist like the Yellow Turban Rebellion founder Jiang Jiao, Emperor's fearful of death that set out mass maritime expedition's in search of both an Island of Blest (where the "enlightened man or chen jen resided") and a mushroom of immorality. I've read the stories of the 8- Immortals and how they acted as saint like figures within Chinese History, I've read adaptations of the Taoist thought into modern life and living. Learned how the "Three Teachings" intermingled and their ideologies borrowed from one another. I am here strictly to exchange information and learn information about Taoism and the Three Teachings. Xie xie, zaijian, Lousy Lao Tzu
  22. Tao Convert

    Hi Y'all, My name is Amy, and I have been studying the Tao for about 3 months. I was drifting aimlessly since leaving Christianity 4 years ago. I did a lot of YouTube with Chakras, Meditating, Astral Planes, etc. One day (as I was playing Star Wars, SWTOR), I decided to look more into Taoism. I have known for some time that "The Force" was based on Tao. I read it all the way through in one sitting the first time. I am currently comparing 2 different translations as I read through again. I live in a very conservative town that it is in a very conservative state. It is probably 3 hours to the nearest town that might have a Tao temple. So, I started looking for an online community - and here I am. Thanks!
  23. Find the Fire?

    "Find that fire inside you." The popular modern term to incite motivation and enthusiasm in an individual. To find one's fire is to seek one's goals with determination and straightforwardness that cowers to no obstacle. A mighty forest born of ages long past cannot withstand a spark that ignites a fire, how could one's obstacles or enemies possibly contend? Ah, but however strong and everlasting the fire inside may burn, the inevitable reality comes to pass. Fire may only exist as long as there is fuel to sustain it. The "fire inside" one's motivation, the drive factor, is impossible to attain without fuel. The fuel for one's fire can be described in many ways, and thought of in different forms. Let us begin to forgo the illusions and be more straightforward. Fire is fueled by the ego. Fueled by the self. Whatever myriad form it may take is irrelevant, because determination, hate, sorrow, humiliation, shame, anger, and other forms of ego motivated emotions will always supply a finite amount of fuel for one's fire. An individual feels a response, then a burst of flame. But a raging fire will always settle into kindling. For those who seek motivation, fuel, who often delve with fire, I offer my favorite chapter of the Tao Te Ching: Chapter 15 The ancient masters were subtle, mysterious, profound, responsive. The depth of their knowledge is unfathomable. Because it is unfathomable, All we can do is describe their appearance. Watchful, like men crossing a winter stream. Alert, like men aware of danger. Courteous, like visiting guests. Yielding, like ice about to melt. Simple, like uncarved blocks of wood. Hollow, like caves. Opaque, like muddy pools. Who can wait quietly while the mud settles? Who can remain still until the moment of action? Observers of the Tao do not seek fulfilment. Not seeking fulfillment, they are not swayed by desire for change. This may not be my preferred translation, however it does help convey a truth. The fire inside is but an illusion. The ego is not the way, and one's inner self knows this reality. But let us ask, what can stop the water from falling? Is there a possibility for one man to cease a waterfall? Can a river's rapid course be diverted by the rocks that reside in its bed? Water has no emotion, as it yields to all things. A Taoist favorite among imagery, nevertheless, it is for a reason. If you are an individual in need of motivation, then observe water. Yield and go with the flow of events. When the times comes for you to crash like the massive waves of the ocean in a storm, then you will do so effortlessly. When morning comes and the water is calm and undisturbed, you will return as nature intended. There is no emotion, only the Tao.
  24. New and Looking for Teacher in MD

    Hello Bums, I've been coming to this forum on and off for several years. I've had an interest in Taoism for about 5 years and have been reading the Tao Te Ching each morning for about that long. I also read about Buddhism and practice meditation. I've never had a teacher. Someone said I might have some luck finding one if I post about it here. Best wishes to everyone on the path. forest-turtle
  25. sex and spirituality

    I am a new member on this forum.Sex has always been a confusing matter to me.Sometimes it makes me feel ecstatic and sometimes it makes me feel low.So, i decided to find answers to my questions regarding sex and how it influences my attitude towards life. During my search i came to know about left hand path of tantra which talks about achieving the highest goal of life by using some techniques and methods.These methods also involve sex as a important part to reach the highest goal of life that is kundalini awakening. However the path of tantra is very hard and not easy to follow. I think following tantric practises without a guru can cause much harm to the body and also it is very diffficult to find true and authentic gurus under whom these practises can be followed. I would really love to share the knowledge on this forum and meet people who also want to reveal the secrets of life and sex. I also read mantak chia book- the multi orgasmic man. i found that both tantra and tao talk about conserving the same thing and moving it upwards. In tantra it is called bindu and in tao it is called chi.Moving this energy gives tremendous power to a human being. I would really love to meet the people interested in both tantra and tao and i want to become more aware about these topics. However, i also believe that only one path should be used to reach a certain goal and that path must be choosen with utmost care and responsibility. Hope i will get to know which path should i choose in life using valuable advices of people on this forum.