Jonesboy

Lankavatara Sutra

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I think this is the passage that the author of Lankavatara was paraphrasing:

 

 

Monks, there are these two views:  view of becoming, and view of annihilation.  Monks, whatever recluses and Brahmins adhere to the view of becoming, have come under the view of becoming, cleave to the view of becoming, these are obstructed from the view of annihilation.  Monks, whatever recluses and Brahmins adhere to the view of annihilation, have come under the view of annihilation, cleave to the view of annihilation, these are obstructed from the view of becoming.  Monks, whatever recluses or Brahmins do not comprehend as they really are the rise and fall of, and satisfaction in, and peril of these two views and the escape from them, these have attachment, these have aversion, these have confusion, these have craving, these have grasping, these are unintelligent, these are yielding and hindered, these delight in impediments, these are not utterly freed from birth, ageing, dying, grief, sorrow, suffering, lamentation, despair--these are not utterly free from anguish, I say.  But whatever recluses or Brahmins comprehend as they really are the rise and fall of, and satisfaction in, and peril of these two views and the escape from them, these are without attachment, these are without aversion, these are without confusion, these are without craving, these are without grasping, these are intelligent, these are unyielding and unhindered, these do not delight in impediments, these are utterly freed from birth, ageing, dying, grief, sorrow, suffering, lamentation, despair--these are utterly free from anguish, I say. 

 

(Culasihanadasuttsa "Lesser Discourse on the Lion's Roar", Pali Text Society MN I pg 87)

 

Gautama continues the analysis in this vein:

 

 

Monks, there are these four (kinds of) grasping.  What are the four?  The grasping of sense-pleasures, the grasping of view, the grasping of rule and custom, the grasping of the theory of self....

 

 

Looks like the author of Lankavatara summarized "escape from them" in Gautama's treatment with "in either case they imagine emancipation where there is no emancipation."  

 

I feel a little better about Lankavatara.  Thanks, Tom.

 

 

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"Arhats rise when the error of all discrimination is realized. Error being discriminated by the Wise turns into Truth by virtue of the 'turning about' that takes place within the deepest consciousness."

 

This striking phrase occurs repeatedly in the Lankavatara Sutra - "the 'turning about' that takes place within the deepest consciousness". I believe this is "asraya paravrtti", sometimes translated as "transformation of the basis", "overturning the basis" or "revolution at the base of consciousness".


As a practitioner with an interest in Chan, I have come to associate this with the early Chan practice of "contemplating mind" the direct path in which the mind turns back upon itself and counter-illuminates the non-dual, space-like mind-source. This practice perhaps continues in Zen's "eko hensho" and the "backward step that turns the light and shines it inward".

 

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