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Wun Yuen Gong

Sword Finger Skills

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Hi All,

 

Anyone train the sword fingers in there ART?

 

I see that KunLun level 2 from Max also has a standing med for it, who else trains it and would like to share there training proceedure and methods?

 

WYG

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Hi All,

 

Anyone train the sword fingers in there ART?

 

I see that KunLun level 2 from Max also has a standing med for it, who else trains it and would like to share there training proceedure and methods?

 

WYG

 

 

you first!

 

B)

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Sure, i will share with you some basic training of sword finger for healing in my Wun Yuen system.

 

Stand or be seated have the swordn fingers pointing forwards allowing the chi to reach to and past the finger tops. To enhance the chi you breath deep and fast like a bellows and you should heat up fast and feel the chi travel down to the sword fingers. Then as practice for feeling the chi you hold out your palm left or right and you draw circles or lines on the palm with the sword fingers and also stabbing through the palms.

 

I was told this belongs to Thunder and lighting training using the sword fingers!

 

WYG

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Mostly when practicing the jian. It is also used a few times in the Shi Ba Luo Han Gong set I pratice.

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Word up. I've been researching that style> just saw it in person for the first time a few weeks ago. Really sparked my interest, recognized some movements that seem familiar. Shaolin roots? Is it an "internal" Shaolin style? Anyways, eager to continue this dialog and learn more about it.

Edited by Spectrum

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I don't know too much about the origin but here's what I know.

My shiye is Huang Chien-Liang. He learned the set from his teacher, Wang Chueh-Jen. Wang helped develop the curriculum at the Central Kuoshu Academy founded in 1928. He claimed his primary teachers to be his father and a man named Ho Ta-Sun.

This is a set of martial qigong exercises attributed to Shaolin, mainly because of the name of the set. Luo Han refers to a Buddhist adept that has transcended earthly desires. The exact origin is unknown to my knowledge.

My teacher suggests those of us studying neigong to do them as we would internal exercises, using the yi to guide the qi and remaining relaxed. He has the external students practice them with isometric tension. He tells us that they are very valuable for building martial skills. I know that they have had a profound effect on me when I practice them regularly. They can be very demanding and build balance, strength, flexibility, rooting, and open several of the major meridians to enhance energetic cultivation. I don't do the dynamic tension consistently but I do use it on occasion. I'm more into the neigong practice.

I don't know how our set compares to any other.

I've attached an image of the hanzi/pinyin/English translation of the forms we practice.

I hope this helps.

Edited by xuesheng

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Xue,

 

Thank you so much for sharing.

 

In going through videos looking for clues this one caught my eye. I posted it on my blog. Something looks so familiar about this. Maybe it's just that he's smooth and connected...

 

LuoHan Demo? : http://sacredcircuits.net/blog/?p=351

 

I don't know too much about the origin but here's what I know.

 

I copied some info on the 18 LuoHan to here: http://sacredcircuits.net/blog/?p=350

 

 

This is a set of martial qigong exercises attributed to Shaolin, mainly because of the name of the set. Luo Han refers to a Buddhist adept that has transcended earthly desires. The exact origin is unknown to my knowledge.

 

 

I know that they have had a profound effect on me when I practice them regularly.

 

Comparable to other effects of chi gung practice?

 

They can be very demanding and build balance, strength, flexibility, rooting, and open several of the major meridians to enhance energetic cultivation.

 

May have my question answered right there.

 

I've attached an image of the hanzi/pinyin/English translation of the forms we practice.

I hope this helps.

 

Thanks for the kind help!

 

Spectrum

 

 

I've attached an image of the hanzi/pinyin/English translation of the forms we practice.

 

 

What a little treasure chest.

 

Has your teacher told any of the stories related to the names of these movements?

 

For instance:

 

#5 Demon (there is another word for this?) Explores the Sea.

# 9 Iron Ox Plows the Field.

#18 Precious Jug Hangs on a Gold Book

 

It's a time capsule waiting to be opened!

 

Thanks again,

 

Spectrum

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Xue,

 

Thank you so much for sharing.

 

In going through videos looking for clues this one caught my eye. I posted it on my blog. Something looks so familiar about this. Maybe it's just that he's smooth and connected...

 

LuoHan Demo? : http://sacredcircuits.net/blog/?p=351

I copied some info on the 18 LuoHan to here: http://sacredcircuits.net/blog/?p=350

Comparable to other effects of chi gung practice?

May have my question answered right there.

Thanks for the kind help!

 

Spectrum

What a little treasure chest.

Some similarities to other practices - qi mobilization, sense of health and well being, sense of clarity and alertness. Differences - more demanding physically and several single leg postures and some jumping and intense streching. It seems to push the physical development more as well as challenging the balance and flexibility. Also, it's a pretty long set so endurance is an issue in the beginning.

 

Thanks for the links. THe video shows some definite similarities to some of our forms but many differences as well. The demonstrator has obvious high level skill. I'd be wary of the "explanation" of the origin of the 18 Luohan as I think it is more legendary than documented, but the info on the 18 Luohan is really fascinating, thanks!

 

Has your teacher told any of the stories related to the names of these movements?

 

For instance:

 

#5 Demon (there is another word for this?) Explores the Sea.

# 9 Iron Ox Plows the Field.

#18 Precious Jug Hangs on a Gold Book

 

It's a time capsule waiting to be opened!

 

Thanks again,

 

Spectrum

#5 夜叉 - ye cha is literally 'night fork' and refers colloquially to an ugly demon or devil of the night and is also seen in the Yang style Taiji jian form where the same name exists. The similarity is that in both forms, one sweeps the hand or tip of jian along the floor which is where the 'explores the sea' is reflected. There must be some folklore reference to a demon at sea at night but that's beyond my level of knowledge.

 

#9 Iron ox plows the field is very descriptive. It contains movement of punching into the ground while standing erect, bending from the waist, and lthen eaning back with the palms hooked under the thighs giving the feeling of a yoke

 

#18 Precious jug hangs on a gold hook - the reaching and waving movement of the arms and sword fingers reminds one of hanging something from a hook on the wall so maybe the precious jug refers to the vessel of qi, perhaps, that one is developing and the fact that this is the last exercise implies it's time to hang the jug up and call it a night.

 

These are just my interpretations. My teacher doesn't like to talk much and give explanations. I believe that most of the movements are descriptive and linked to various elements of Chinese culture.

Edited by xuesheng

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