Kojiro

Fasting or The Art Of Training Without Training

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Posted (edited)
On 2/10/2022 at 12:57 PM, freeform said:

The spiritual aspect of fasting has to do with giving up something that you desire habitually.

 

Food is one of the more fundamental things.

 

It takes longer than 16hrs of ‘fasting’ to get much out of it though :)

 

One or two weeks is usually what’s required. 
 

But if you’re lacking in blood or yin (Jing) - then you can damage your health with fasting.

 

Similarly if your body is generating a lot of qi (and is in a generator mode) then fasting can be dangerous too.

 

Prepare well. Get diagnosis from a decent Chinese medicine practitioner first. (And possibly from a western physician too).

 

Make sure you have access to medical support during the fast.
 

Transition from qi generating and purgative practices (standing, moving, purging) to stillness based practices.

 

Plan your period of transition from eating to fasting - and from fasting to eating. These transitions should take at least 3 days. Make sure you reintroduce gently nourishing foods (not raw juices/salads smoothies - which seems to be popular).

this spiritual aspect of giving up something you desire and something to which you are accustomed since early childhood is one of the best things of fasting, and one which can strengthen your mind to the next level. But it is also one of the most difficult things. You do need to conquer your cravings, fears and desires. In the process you retrain your nervous system, your brain, so it is able to work (better) with less food, breaking the addiction and the habit.

 

You say you need one or two weeks of fasting to get this spiritual results, and you are probably right. Although I think that now I need something more gradual to improve my health. Can I ask you how long has been your longest fast? I would like to know about your experiences @freeform.

Edited by Kojiro

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Posted (edited)
On 16/09/2022 at 5:09 PM, Kojiro said:

… overcome … desire …


And then what will you do? I treasure my desires; it’s what keeps me enthusiastic about life. :)
 

 

Edited by Cobie

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Posted (edited)

that's good if your desires are wholesome. if they are unwholesome you have a big problem, and overeating is a very dangerous thing

Edited by Kojiro

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Another thing I am learning these days is that a kind of hunger pain in the belly at mealtime or before doesn't mean real hunger, but real disease. It seems that real hunger is felt more in the mouth and throat, similar to thirst. At least this is what some authors like Herbert Shelton and Mcfadden say. Anyway, this feeling of hunger pain in the belly, gnawing, all-goneness or emptiness means irritation or congestion of the stomach, but it is easy to interpret it erroneously as hunger. When one has this peculiar feeling eating will not solve it.

 

John Tilden: "The first symptom of food-poisoning is a feeling of discomfort ; it may be in the stomach about mealtime — a symptom that some describe as hunger pains, others as an all-gone feeling, and still others as a gnawing feeling. Eating relieves it, and that is why those who have the symptom believe it is due to the need of food. As the disease (nervous irritation of the stomach) advances, those suffering with the symptom acquire the habit of eating between meals, because, while the disease is developing, eating always brings relief. It is the same kind of relief, however, that the inebriate experiences when he finds relief in taking a drink. The food fiend finds relief in this way until gastritis, ulcer of the stomach, or cancer converts such relief into pain, torture."

 

"A very common symptom is a feeling of discomfort midway between meals--sometimes, in the early stages, starting up an hour before the regular meal-time. This discomfort is described as a hunger pain. If these symptoms are relieved by eating, the patient grows worse; the desire for food becomes more urgent, and occurs at shorter intervals, until a time arrives when the patient is suffering great distress constantly, due to decomposition, and the irritation, inflammation, and congestion that follow."

Edited by Kojiro

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Yesterday I did a 24 hours dry fast, after a long time without doing dry fasts. The last one was before summer, because summers here are very hot, so I prefered not to do it. But now it is cold again and I decided to go dry for 24 hours. In winter we do not need so much hydration. The day was good for me, I felt perfectly well all the time, almost no hunger nor thirst. It was an easy fast, easier than it often is. At night I slept very well and woke up refreshed and fine.

 

Next week I will probably do another 24 hours fast, but not sure if it will be dry or not. Anyway the important thing is not to eat, more than the drinking part (as long as you avoid overdrinking, which is bad too). Correct rational fasting means always better wellbeing, energy and health.

Edited by Kojiro

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On 7/15/2022 at 12:42 PM, Kojiro said:

Has somebody tried dry fasting maybe?

i routinely dry fast for 4 days every week. its easier for me and more effective. a day of dry fast=3 days of wet one

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3 hours ago, Taoist Texts said:

i routinely dry fast for 4 days every week. its easier for me and more effective. a day of dry fast=3 days of wet one

do you dry fast 4 consecutive days every week? not bad!!

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2 hours ago, Kojiro said:

do you dry fast 4 consecutive days every week? not bad!!

thanks. i do;)

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38 minutes ago, Taoist Texts said:

thanks. i do;)

It seems a lot to me 4 days in a row dry fasting, from now on I will do at least a 24 hours dry or wet fast every week. Can I know how do you refeed and rehydrate after this?

Edited by Kojiro

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1 hour ago, Kojiro said:

It seems a lot to me 4 days in a row dry fasting, from now on I will do at least a 24 hours dry or wet fast every week. Can I know how do you refeed and rehydrate after this?

sure thing. For me the first rule is not to drink plain still water because it is quickly absorbed with a shock to the system so i drink anything but (usually a beer). And the second rule is to avoid carbs and acidic fruit because carbs congest the system while acid burns my mouth. On the first day so i usually start with plain yoghurt with a banana or a sweet apple for breakfast and anything but carbs for supper. Next day i  eat anyting.

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Yesterday I did another 24 hours dry fast. This time it was not as easy as last week. This morning I have felt quite bad, but then as hours passed by I felt better. I like dry fasts, to me it is the real fast, no water no food! It is the most difficult type of fasting, I hope it is the most powerful too. To this date there are not many studies about dry fasting, so you can only know experimenting yourself or listening to other people who also do it.

 

Anyway maybe next time I will not go dry, as it can be quite hard and taxing.

Edited by Kojiro

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