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Ancient Alchemy And Advanced Algorithms

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"It is stated in the holy scriptures or books, dear lady, that there exists a race of daimons who have commerce with women. Hermes made mention of them in his Physika; in fact almost the entire work, openly and secretly, alludes to them. It is related in the ancient and divine scriptures that certain angels lusted for women, and descending from the heavens, they taught them all the arts of nature. On account of this, says the scripture, they offended god, and now live outside heaven—because they taught to men all the evil arts which are of no advantage
to the soul.

 

These same scriptures also say that from them [sc. the angels] the giants were born. Their initial transmission about these arts came from Chêmes. He called this book the Book of Chêmes, whence the art is called Chêmeia."

 

from the Chronographia

 

- Zosimos of Panopolis

 

 

 

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In accordance with the opportune celestial moments (tôn kairôn), and the necessary revolution of the heavenly sphere, it came to pass that a certain one of the angels who dwell in the first firmament, having seen me from above, was filled with the desire to unite with me in intercourse.

 

He was quickly on the verge of attaining his end, but I did not yield, wishing to inquire of him as to the preparation of gold and silver. When I asked this of him, he said that he was not permitted to disclose it, on account of the exalted character of the mysteries, but that on the following day a superior angel, Amnael, would come. 

 

The next day, when the sun reached the middle of its course, the superior angel, Amnael, appeared and descended. Taken with the same passion for me he did not delay, but hastened to where I was. But I was no less anxious to inquire after these matters. When he delayed incessantly, I did not give myself over to him, but mastered (epekratoun) his passion until he showed the sign on his head and revealed the mysteries I sought, truthfully and without reservation.

 

from Isis the Prophetess to Her Son Horus, Codex Marcianus


- Zosimos of Panoplis

 

 

 

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The Anthropos, seeing a resemblance of his form in her [sc. Nature], fell in love and desired to make a home there. Immediately his wish was made actual, and he came to dwell in form devoid of reason. Nature, having received the object of her love, engulfed him utterly and they mingled in passion. For they were in love.

 

from the Poimandres,  Corpus Hermeticum

 

 

 

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When Light (Phôs) was in paradise, pervaded by spirit (diapneomenos), they [sc. the archons], in the service of Fate, persuaded him—who was without malice and powerless—to clothe himself in the Adam, which they had created from Fate and the four elements. On account of his innocence he did not resist, and they boasted because he had been reduced to slavery.

 

from On the Letter Omega

 

- Zosimos of Panoplis

 

 

 

zosimooooos.jpg

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The angels were astonished at the acts of disobedience committed by the human beings on earth, claiming they would do better than them. Therefore, God challenged the angels to choose two representatives among them, who would descend to earth and be endowed with bodily desires. During their stay on earth, they fell in love with a woman named Zohra (often identified with Venus). She told them she would become intimate with them if they joined her in idolatry. The angels refused and remained pious. Later they met her again and the woman this time stated she would become intimate with them if they drank alcohol. The angels thought that alcohol could not cause great harm and therefore, they accepted the condition. After they were drunk, they became intimate with her and after noticing a witness, they killed him. On the next day, Harut and Marut regretted their deeds but could not ascend to heaven anymore due to their sins, as their link to the angels was broken. Thereupon, God asked them, either their punishment shall be in this world or in the hereafter. They chose to be punished on earth and therefore were sent to Babel, teaching humans magic but not without warning them that they were just a temptation.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harut_and_Marut

 

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Isis, in the meantime, had gone searching for her missing husband and finally arrived at the court of Byblos. Disguised as an older woman, she ingratiated herself to the royal family by teaching the handmaidens how to plait their hair and became nursemaid to the young princes. Isis was particularly fond of the younger child, Dictys, and tried to make him immortal by burning away his mortal part in a flame. When the queen found her doing this one night she became upset and Isis threw off her disguise to reveal herself as a goddess.

 

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Isis on [hearing] the news, sheared off one of her tresses, and put on a mourning robe, whence the city, even to the present day has the name of “Copto” (I beat the breast). . . . She learnt by inquiry that the chest had been washed up by the sea at a place called Byblos, and that the surf had gently laid it under an Erica tree. This Erica, a most lovely plant, growing up very large in a very short time had enfolded, embraced and concealed the coffer within itself. The king of the place being astonished at the size of the plant, and having cut away the clump that concealed the coffer from sight, set the latter up as a pillar to support his roof.

 

They tell how Isis having learnt all this by the divine breath of fame, came to Byblos, and sitting down by the side of a spring all dejected and weeping spoke not a word to any other persons, but saluted and made friends of the maid servants of the queen, by dressing their hair for them, and infusing into their bodies a wonderful perfume out of herself; when the queen saw her maids again, she fell a longing to see the stranger, whose hair and whose body breathed of ambrosial perfume; and so she was sent for, [and] becoming intimate with the queen, was made nurse of her infant. The king’s name they say was Malacander, herself some call Astarte, others Sooses, others Neinanoë, who is the same with the Greek Athenais.

 

- Plutarch 

 

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With the rise of the cult of Osiris, the djed came to be firmly associated with him and, especially, with the tree of Byblos which enclosed him and the pillar made from that tree. The djed is often overlooked in Egyptian art, and especially in architecture, simply because it is so ubiquitous; the djed is featured on pillars, tomb walls, architraves (the main beam which rests on pillars), palace walls, sheets of painted papyrus, and especially sarcophagi. Once one is aware of the djed and its importance to ancient Egyptian culture it is impossible to miss. It is a potent symbol associated with the god Osiris and his return from the dead. The symbol has been interpreted to represent different objects such as the god Osiris' backbone, the tamarisk tree which enclosed the god, four pillars rising one behind another, and a fertility pole raised at festivals. `Stability', however,  seems to have been its prime meaning and the one which the ancient Egyptians attached the greatest importance to.

 

https://www.ancient.eu/Djed/

 

 

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In 1849, Layard gave us the first analytical term for discussing the AST seen in fig. 2 when he described the crowning element as a honeysuckle.

 

"We have, moreover, in the earliest monuments of Nineveh, that graceful ornament, commonly called the honeysuckle, which was so extensively used in Greece, and to this day more generally employed than any other moulding .... [T]he simple flower [honeysuckle] becomes a tree, bearing many flowers of the same shape. "

 

George Rawlinson used Layard's term in his own description of the AST as a 'pillar':

 

"The simplest [ example] consists of a short pillar springing from a single pair of rams' horns, and surmounted by a capital composed of two pairs of rams' horns separated by one, two, or three horizontal bands; above which there is, first, a scroll resembling that which commonly surmounts the winged circle, and then a flower, very much like the 'honeysuckle ornament' of the Greeks."

 

As a footnote to this, Rawlinson attributed the honeysuckle description to Layard and chose (instead) to understand the topmost element of the AST as the head of a palm:

 

"This resemblance which Mr. Layard notes (Nineveh and its Remains, vol. 2, p. 294) is certainly very curious; but it does not tel1 us anything of the origin or meaning of the symbol. The Greeks probably adopted the ornament as elegant, without caring to understand it. I suspect the so-called 'flower' was in reality a representation of the head of a palm-tree, with the form of which, as portrayed on the earliest sculptures (Layard, Monuments, pl. 53), it nearly agrees."

 

Although Rawlinson found the source of the AST's crowning element in the palm, he did not interpret the AST as a conventionalized representation of the date palm. Instead, he interpreted it along the lines of the asherah of the Phoenicians referred to in the Old Testament, understood by him to be a wooden cult object.

 

"lt is a subject of curious speculation, whether this sacred tree does not stand connected with the Asherah of the Phoenicians, which was certainly not a 'grove,' in the sense in which we commonly understand that ward. The Asherah, which the J ews adopted from the idolatrous nations with whom they came into contact, was an artificial structure, originally of wood, but in the later times probably of metal, capable of being 'set' in the temple at Jerusalem by one king, and 'brought out' by another.

 

I once showed a very large and unusual piece of old Persian embroidery to Rabbi Baba, the most learned of the Nestorians of Urumia who has prepared a careful and complete dictionary of the Nestorian Syriac dialect. It represented an enormous tree full of branches, and the branches were full of extraordinary conventional fruit. I asked him the meaning of it, and he replied that it typified the fortunes of man. It was then a tree of fortune. Rabbi Baba told me that on a Mosul rug of mine, having a design much like the Assyrian sacred tree, with its seven pairs of branches and their fruit of different colors, the tree represented the fortunes of life, the lower fruit light-green, meaning the ignorance of childhood, red the stirring of blood, black trouble, etc. Such I take it is this sacred tree of the Assyrians and their neighbors."

 

https://www.zora.uzh.ch/id/eprint/141569/1/Giovino_2007_The_Assyrian_Sacred_Tree.pdf

 

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Zosimus explains that the doctrine of the primal human is known to many cultures: the Egyptians call him Thoth, the “interpreter of all things,” and the Jews,Chaldeans, and other Near Eastern peoples call him Adam, or “earth.”  Thoth and Adam are the names of the “man of flesh,” but the Anthropos is also composed of an inner “man of spirit,” whose name is Phōs, or light.

 

Zosimus reads Hesiod’s myth of Prometheus and Epimetheus as the Greek version of the Anthropos myth. He identifies the spiritual man with Prometheus, who brought heavenly fire to humankind and warned his brother Epimetheus not to accept the gifts of Zeus, or Fate. Epimetheus, who accepts Fate’s gift of Pandora, and thus indirectly brings evil into the world, is the man of flesh. Zosimus says that “by the allegorical method,” Prometheus and Epimetheus are to be understood as “a single man, that is, soul and body.”

 

Zosimus gives a “Hebrew” account of how the man of spirit became flesh. Inthe Garden of Eden, Phōs, who was “innocent and unactivated,” was persuaded by the agents of Fate to “clothe himself with their Adam, who comes from Fate.” The sinister agents of Fate rejoiced that they had deceived Phōs and enslaved him. 

 

A similar theme is found in several “gnostic” texts, where Adam’s body is created by the cosmic creator and his minions, the planetary archons, but Adam’s spirit is created by a divine source. The notion of two different creators for the spirit and body of the Anthropos, one good and one evil, is not found in Hermetic literature, and Zosimus apparently uses the “gnostic” version to underscore the difference between corporeal and incorporeal knowledge, since he plays upon the distinction between flesh and spirit throughout the text.

 

Zosimus refers to the man of spirit in Hermetic terms as the Son of God, one of the divine beings of the “ineffable Triad.” In Hermetic thought, the divine is often conceived as a trinity consisting of the divine Father and his two “sons,” Mind and Logos (also called Will).  Mind and Logos are understood as aspects of the one ineffable God, but they are also personified as distinct entities with their own specific yet interrelated, functions. Mind (also called the second Mind) is the Demiurge, who creates the cosmic framework and the seven planets that govern the cosmos; the planetary government is called Fate. The third aspect of the trinity, Logos, also called the Son of God, is the will and word of God; he is a co-creator of the cosmos, and the divine presence within nature. The Son of God is also the Anthropos, the divine being who becomes flesh, and the savior who awakens humans to their divine nature.

 

https://www.academia.edu/22599267/Zosimus_of_Panopolis_Alchemy_nature_and_religion_in_late_antiquity

 

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Of course many spirits desire sexual union, including those with physical bodies as well as those who are discarnate. This is so commonplace that I ask, what is the question, if any?

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