dawei

[DDJ Meaning] Chapter 43

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David Hinton 2002

43

The weakest in all beneath heaven gallops through the strongest, and vacant absence slips inside solid presence.
I know by this the value of nothing's own doing.
The teaching without words, the value of nothing's own doing: few indeed master such things.


Chad Hansen 2009

43

The most yielding in the social world 
gallops over the most firm in the social world. 
That which lacks being enters into that which lacks space. 
I, with this, know the advantage of lacking deem-acting. 
The teaching that is not put in language, 
The advantage of lacking deem-acting, 
In the social world, these are rarely achieved. 

 

Moss Roberts 2001

43

In this world below the sky
The gentle wind will outdo the strong,
And the nonmaterial are able
To enter the impregnable.
Thus I know and know for sure
The gains that under-acting yields.
But teaching by the word unspoken
In this world few can master;
The gains that under-acting yields
In this world few realize.


Lok Sang Ho 2002

43

The most gentle and the most flexible of the world
Certainly outperforms the strongest and the hardest.
What appears intangible and without substance
Can penetrate the narrowest gaps.
From this we can appreciate the benefits of not contriving.
The wordless teaching, and the benefits of not contriving76,
Certainly find no match under heaven. 


Gu Zhengku 1993

43

The most supple in the world
Can go through the hardest in the world.
What consists of no substance can enter what has no crevices.
I thus know the benefit of inaction.
Teaching without words,
The benefit of inaction,
Are what few people in the world can perform and obtain.


Lin Yutang 1948

43

The softest substance of the world 
Goes through the hardest. 
That-which-is-without-form penetrates that-which-has-no-crevice; 
Through this I know the benefit of taking no action. 
The teaching without words 
And the benefit of taking no action 
   Are without compare in the universe.


Flowing Hands 1987

43

The sky is formless but distinct.
It has a form, but no one can pierce a hole in it.
So I know the value of formless form,
of being without being,
of working without working,
in teaching without using words.
The Ten Thousand Things will then rise and fall naturally, without interference.
 

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2 hours ago, dawei said:

The most supple in the world
Can go through the hardest in the world.

I like this.

 

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3 hours ago, dawei said:

Gu Zhengku 1993

43

The most supple in the world
Can go through the hardest in the world.
What consists of no substance can enter what has no crevices.
I thus know the benefit of inaction.
Teaching without words,
The benefit of inaction,
Are what few people in the world can perform and obtain.

 

 

He may not be a well known chinese author and translator but is in the academic and philosophical vein of Wing-Tsit Chan (east) and Hendricks (west).   His book has the chinese character and pinyin on left page with english translation on right.  A few notes are provided as he translated just after the Guodian was discovered and includes a translation of The Great One Begot Water (太一生水), which was discovered among the Guodian documents.  Each page carries a background image that adds a nice touch to the book.    His introductory notes are a good read.   he is (was) a professor at Peking University. 

 

Looking at Amazon, they have this book in a few releases but not one that I have of his, on The Three Character Canon (三字经) often translated as Classic which includes also The Essay on One Thousand Characters (千字文).   

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I guess there are just some authors/translators whose writings I don't get. Chad Hansen is one of these. His choice of words and manner of expression I find difficult. Not that that's bad ... it stops me in my tracks and forces me to think hard about what he is trying to convey. 

 

For instance, what does ... the advantage of lacking deem-acting ... really mean. Such an odd turn of a phrase. I think there is more to this line than inaction or non-doing , as suggeted by others. I think Lok Sang Ho expresses it best with the benefits of not contriving.

 

 

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8 hours ago, OldDog said:

I guess there are just some authors/translators whose writings I don't get. Chad Hansen is one of these. His choice of words and manner of expression I find difficult. Not that that's bad ... it stops me in my tracks and forces me to think hard about what he is trying to convey. 

 

For instance, what does ... the advantage of lacking deem-acting ... really mean. Such an odd turn of a phrase. I think there is more to this line than inaction or non-doing , as suggeted by others. I think Lok Sang Ho expresses it best with the benefits of not contriving.

 

Chad Hansen is a bit unorthodox for sure.  His A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought: A Philosophical Interpretation

 

was quite a sensational book in 2000.   I would highly recommend reading it to understand his point of view.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Daoist-Theory-Chinese-Thought-Interpretation/dp/0195134192/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1535245956&sr=1-1&refinements=p_27%3AChad+Hansen&dpID=51AcOb8yDTL&preST=_SY291_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_&dpSrc=srch

 

He and Hinton don't tend to use the word 'Dao' so they are included for such variations that exist. 

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