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The Secret Technique in Plain Sight - Zhan Zhuang

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25 minutes ago, Earl Grey said:

 

A standing desk and a ZZ posture are totally different. To say ZZ is "just standing" is not what a seasoned practitioner would use to characterize what ZZ is, especially since there are huge differences between how you stand and more importantly, how you are in the meditative state in ZZ versus using a standing desk. 

 

Obviously, but my point is that standing perfectly still or being dogmatic about posture isn't necessary. 

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in my experience, when I'm doing standing it is too easy to get some stupid idea that I need to do something and then run off and do it but if I'm sitting I'm kind of 'stuck' where I am and more likely to stay.  Therefore it is better to do standing with another so we keep each other from drifting away to do some errand which doesn't need to be done at the time.

 

However there is one way to do Zhan Zhuang which more easily keeps one in the game so to speak, however it may not fit some people's definition of ZZ.

 

Edit:   Dayum!  I just found out I posted in the sex forum, my first one.  Why is this thread here?  Wait, I know.

Edited by Starjumper
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On 2/22/2018 at 7:28 AM, Miffymog said:

Just to play devil's advocate, there could be a couple of reasons for this. The first is that in the West an easier and more gentle approach to Qi Gong might be a bit more palatable. Also, it might be that Zhan Zhuang is best taken up after a degree of proficiency is achieved in other practices.

 

Just a couple of days ago I added a lying practice to my standing, moving and sitting practices and I’ve found having a variety really means each one assists the other.

 

My favourite one and the one I do first thing is a stand, but now I’ve got other ones, I know that if my knee gives up, I’ll still have three other techniques to fall back on which all help my wellbeing.

 

 

I have found that if you are experiencing knee problems that you can slightly change foot position and thigh angle and get relief without lessening overall results. You may have to catch it early on though.

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On 2/22/2018 at 11:29 AM, Cheshire Cat said:

If man was to follow nature, then he should avoid standing still.

One of the main points of Zhan Zhuang is to relax the body under strain while holding yourself up with intent, instead of muscular strength.  One cannot go to the next level without the sharpening of relaxed intent.

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On 2/23/2018 at 2:37 AM, Miffymog said:

 

:)

I like seated meditation because it's something I feel I could have stumbled across by myself as it feels nice to do. I've always seen standing as something I'd never have come up with myself, and like Cheshire Cat says, not something you come across in normal life.


 

I was reading something somewhere that suggested that because evolutionally we’ve only learnt to stand up fairly recently, the posterial muscles we should be using for this haven’t caught up and developed as they should yet. A standing practice strengthens them and gives you that ‘evolutionary edge’, kind of.

I find that mixing up standing and sitting, when done, correctly, complement each other.

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6 hours ago, Earl Grey said:

 

That depends entirely on your teacher and system. In two of my four lineages, one of which includes Yi Quan from a direct student of Wang Xiang Zhai--yes, perfect stillness and the many specific postures is necessary. 

My comments above about intent (or if you wish, focused will through concentration and imagery) also comes from my experience with Yi Quan as well as Tai Chi. I always enjoy reading what you have to say.

Edited by moment
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Sedentary ppl would greatly benefit from standing or moving practice. My thoughts are when it comes to the endgame of ZZ, if you move or don't move the result will likely be the same.  What is the theory behind my statement not being true, outside of tradition says do XYZ? Our nervous system works no matter if we are sitting, standing or slumped over. I feel the same about practices that demand a straight spine so that the energy can flow or perfect form. I only believe in 'perfect' form when it is for health reasons, not for energy flow or just because. 

I'm going to take up this practice passively and actively. 
 

Edited by Mikey_Power_Up

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I'm not a big fan of tradition or even loyalty to a teacher. I'm more of the show me what it is, I will give it a serious 'shot' and then make it work for me. I know that some are into lineages, history, and authenticity. I'm more of the belief that the human body is the human body, we can all hack it, but of course having a great teacher to get you started is great.

 By the way, I just did around 40 mins of ZZ and it felt great. It totally took me out of my morning slump. On the physical level, I can see how it can help me regain strength in my ankle I injured trying to be LBJ. On the energy level, I played around too much and got outside the confines of the teaching but when things start to stir, I tend to want to tangle a bit. I will add it as something I do throughout the day. 

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How is willing to do the work without any extraneous additives lesser than taking on all the ideas that may or may not be pertinent towards reaching the endgame of such a practice? Or any practice? 

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On 5/16/2018 at 4:38 AM, Earl Grey said:

 

Fantastic combination using these two systems, isn't it? Let us talk more sometime about it because I am always happy to trade notes with fellow practitioners, especially those with a similar focus!

I practice my standing by examining every joint, ligament, muscle until the slightest effort has tension and relaxation as one. Then I work fast and slow, forward and backward,  up, down, lifting, pulling, putting my intent farther and farther out and pulling it back again like it is against heavy water.  I review all of my known polarities, all of this with little to no physical movement.  After awhile of that, I am ready for Tai Chi.

Edited by moment

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9 hours ago, Earl Grey said:

 

That actually sounds like you've either learned something very profound or discovered it independently through deep understanding. How do I know this? It is one of the later practices in Yi Quan. 

 

Try not to sound so surprised:) I prefer to do my aforementioned intent projections while doing left and right Santi Stance(San Cai Zhuang).I sometimes do a rhythmic bouncing back and forth between my perineum and sphincter muscles after I move into Cheng Bao Zhuang (tree hugger). That is a tune up for when I tighten my perineum muscles and do deep diaphragm breathing.  Even though some Tai Chi Masters teach that type of breathing, I learned it from Hirata Sensei, a great 5th Dan Aikido teacher back in 1972. I sometimes will do that while still in Cheng Bao Zhuang.  It tends to make my Tai Chi sets more interesting.

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On 2/25/2018 at 1:02 PM, idquest said:

It is stillness that is important, not the pose so much.

 

They are both important, each posture does a certain energy task and they have a synchronistic effect with the stillness.

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This kinda came from instinct, but at home when I meditate inside I keep my hands together and against my dan tien.  When I'm outside, for some reason, I feel the need to be more open, and keep my arms separated, hands resting on my knees, two fingers against my thumb and facing up. 

 

When inside, more of closed unit, focused more on dantien, outside, more open, accepting.. sun earth.. stuff.   Don't know if thats good or bad, just something I've fallen into. 

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12 minutes ago, thelerner said:

This kinda came from instinct, but at home when I meditate inside I keep my hands together and against my dan tien.  When I'm outside, for some reason, I feel the need to be more open, and keep my arms separated, hands resting on my knees, two fingers against my thumb and facing up. 

 

When inside, more of closed unit, focused more on dantien, outside, more open, accepting.. sun earth.. stuff.   Don't know if thats good or bad, just something I've fallen into. 

 

Absolutely,  a lot of things change for me when I am in one of my favorite nature spots.

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