Joolian

Healthy breakfast ideas (gluten-free)

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Hey there,

does anyone have some healthy breakfast ideas for me? Since my body at the moment can't tolerate gluten, the ideas should be gluten-free.

What do you eat in the morning?

 

Background to that is that currently I don't give me enough time in the mornings before work and only eat two gluten-free toasts with either some chicken breast and or cheddar cheese. Don't judge me for that laziness, despite eating relatively healthy in general :) I need some other choices/ideas, as I also don't seem to tolerate sugar or high amounts of carbohydrates well. The toasts aren't optimal therefore.

 

Thanks and greetings,

Julian

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Oatmeal can be gluten free, if you're really sensitive there's 100% gluten free oatmeal or try regular which could have slight 'contaminates'.  Oatmeal opens you up to sweet or you can make it savory and add a fried egg to slow down the carb absorption even more.  It's a blank palette waiting for you to add color.

 

Lately I'm doing one egg omelets.  Just using one egg in a small nonstick pan, you don't even need to flip it.  Just use low heat, when it's almost done add a tablespoon or two of anything.. give it a half flip and you're done, faster then making toast. 

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Thanks! Yes, oatmeal could work if I take the gluten-free oats. I have also tried a variant with rice flakes but it wasn't that good to stay as a main breakfast option.

Also thought of trying a Quinoa, Buckwheat, Red millet mixture as a kind of granola. Anyone tried something like that?

 

The one egg omelet idea is very good - didn't think of it yet. When I do omelets it is mostly with 3 eggs and takes a bit longer.

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For really flavoursome omelettes try 3 eggs + 1 extra yolk :) 

Use farm eggs from the markets, if you can. Farm eggs is are more nutritious, not to mention the taste. 

 

In Asia its common to have rice noodles with curry or soup (like Vietnamese pho) for breakfast. Really tasty. 

Or dim sum... most dim-sums (like Chinese tapas) come in dainty quantities, and the sheer variety is excitingly mouth-watering! Its one of my fav oriental breakfast, especially the steamed spare-ribs, glutinous rice wrapped in bamboo leaves, and congee with salted lean pork. 

Edited by C T
corrected careless error
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I‚Äôve¬†attached a PDF in the ‚Äúyou are what you eat‚ÄĚ thread.¬†

 

Medicinal congees, which is a great way to start the day.

 

Check it out if you like. 

 

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 If I have no time, or no desire to spend it by the stove, I boil a couple of eggs and make a speedy egg salad.  Since the common ways to make it never satisfied, I invented and created a special hi tech utensil for the purpose that works faster and cleaner than anything else I've ever tried.  Very proud of it (not of the way it looks, but of the way it works), so I'll take a pic to show you.  Here it is:

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20171201_220647.jpg

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Wow, very cool! Thank you for the picture and idea :)

 

Also thanks Gerard for the soup recommendation. For this one I will have to challenge the inventory of the Asia markets around here. Never used these ingredients. 

 

I think I will try some of the medicinal congees first, especially the ones for the cold condition. Maybe this will help if I make it for some days. I saw a recipe where you freeze the rice before. This way you could make a decent congee in 15 minutes as the rice will cook faster or falls apart faster. 

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You could make your own granola and it last you for 2-3 weeks... use organic rice or quinoa leftovers ... or you can buy organic flakes too, usually in the bulk section of the grocery store)... mixed nuts and seeds  (almonds, walnuts, pecans, sunflower, sesame, pumpkin seeds, etc), dried fruits ( apricots, dates, cranberries, coconut, etc) ... just toast grains  in dry pan for 2-3 mins , add the nuts/seeds and toast another 5 mins and lastly add dry fruits... mixed well... if you want sweeter granola add maple syrup and toast fow 5 more mins...

 

Let it cool and then store in the refrigerator... use for breakfast with milk of choice or it is a perfect snack...if you want to make your own granola bars then extend the mixture in cookie tray ( use parchment paper)  and bake at 350F for 20 mins... you could add a salty flavor by adding some soy sauce to the mix or some nori... hope this helps... here is a picture (you could exclude grains too as I did in this one)

 

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Sorry but I don’t recommend this type of Western food because:

 

1. Very taxing on the Earth element. Hard to digest.

2. Creates mucus in the intestines, blocking the flow of Qi in their corresponding meridians.

 

As a result it irritates/blocks Liver Qi. And trust me in this you do no want to mess up with this element: the General of the Army.

 

Milk? It makes things worse.

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I don’t use milk either or a dairy as a matter of fact which is what fauses inflamation in the mucus... I make my own almond milk...

 

I am unclear why you think this will irritate liver... seeds and nuts contain very critical nutrition elements.... what causes blockage on the liver is processed foods, meats and unhealthy fats...  I think eating natural foods allow your energy to flow easier...  But each person is entitled to their own opinion and experience... so I follow a plant based diet which actually harmonizes with the planet.

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I am also interested as to why this wouldn't be a good idea - since I also use almond milk.

 

And thank you all for your ideas and participating :)

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They are hard to digest. Every now and then OK! :) Not on a regular basis.

 

The Earth Element favours:

 

1. Soups, stews and casseroles

2. Puddings Indian, SE Asian style, http://m.food.ndtv.com/lists/10-best-indian-dessert-recipes-693522

3. Congees

 

Very sound advice:

 

http://cloudgate.com.au/chinese-herbs-for-your-bone-broth-to-take-it-next-level/

 

In Spring, stick to this piece of advice:

 

http://straightbamboo.com/how-to-stay-healthy-in-spring/

 

Edited by Gerard
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About that fork -- forgot to mention that I made it primarily not for egg salad but for speedy guacamole.   If the bums are interested, we could start a Show, Don't Tell food thread with pictures of everybody's creations.  

 

Here's my today's brunch: gluten-free panini with smoked turkey and goat cheese and a side of guacamole, fresh tomatoes, and yes, that's parsley, I eat grass, all cats do, in moderation.  Preparation time under 5 minutes.  (I use a French stovetop cast iron waffle maker to make panini.)   I swear the panini are not burned, but the picture came out much darker than the original for some reason.

 

IMG_20171210_152413.jpg

Edited by Taomeow
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I made a Sri Lankan-influenced dhal (lentils) curry today, to last over a few meals. It was really delicious, with very basic ingredients like onions, garlic, ginger, lemongrass, green chillies, curry leaves, mustard seeds, one stick of cinnamon and one star anise to fry at the start, followed by a garam masala paste, curry powder, a dollop of english mustard, soya sauce and finally coconut milk. Teaspoon of sugar, chicken stock and pinch of salt to tweak the flavour. No pics, sorry. 

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Just now, C T said:

I made a Sri Lankan-influenced dhal (lentils) curry today, to last over a few meals. It was really delicious, with very basic ingredients like onions, garlic, ginger, lemongrass, green chillies, curry leaves, mustard seeds, one stick of cinnamon and one star anise to fry at the start, followed by a garam masala paste, curry powder, a dollop of english mustard, soya sauce and finally coconut milk. Teaspoon of sugar, chicken stock and pinch of salt to tweak the flavour. No pics, sorry. 

 

Sounds delicious. 

 

I also fry some spices at the start when I make curry-inspired dishes, but my mix is from China -- Szechuan pepper ("the numbing spice"), star anise, cayenne, preceded by crushed garlic and salt added right into the hot oil, followed by -- here I switch from China to wherever I might go with this.  Saffron!!         

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3 minutes ago, Taomeow said:

 

Sounds delicious. 

 

I also fry some spices at the start when I make curry-inspired dishes, but my mix is from China -- Szechuan pepper ("the numbing spice"), star anise, cayenne, preceded by crushed garlic and salt added right into the hot oil, followed by -- here I switch from China to wherever I might go with this.  Saffron!!         

 

Lol saffron... expensive taste! I sometimes add extra turmeric (some already blended in to the curry powder), and pretend its saffron.. hehehe

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1 minute ago, C T said:

 

Lol saffron... expensive taste! I sometimes add extra turmeric (some already blended in to the curry powder), and pretend its saffron.. hehehe

 

I would saffron everything if it wasn't so expensive.  And, yes, I also cheat with turmeric. :D  

 

Saffron is mostly reserved for the pilaf...  but sometimes I can't resist the temptation even when making something else.  

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to really do justice to curries, i would add a pinch of salt, a teaspoon of coconut oil and 2 tablespoons of coconut milk when boiling rice to go with what curry I find myself making. Sometimes i'd add a screwpine leaf too when they happen to be available in the Asian store. The subtle oils from the screwpine mixed into anything containing coconut is simply divine! 

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Ah, now we're in the territory too far south from my fusion repertoire!  I don't think I would even recognize a screwpine leaf in the Asian store.  More than half the time, ours don't bother translating what they don't know the English for, and when they do translate, it doesn't make things easier.  Nothing surprises me there after encounters with "red cod idiot fish" and "completely dead weak shell crab."  I dare not imagine what they might do with "screwpine."  

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3 hours ago, Taomeow said:

Ah, now we're in the territory too far south from my fusion repertoire!  I don't think I would even recognize a screwpine leaf in the Asian store.  More than half the time, ours don't bother translating what they don't know the English for, and when they do translate, it doesn't make things easier.  Nothing surprises me there after encounters with "red cod idiot fish" and "completely dead weak shell crab."  I dare not imagine what they might do with "screwpine."  

 

Sounds like your store-keeper has a great sense of humour :D

 

a short screwpine aka pandan leaves intro 

 

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