Starjumper

Tien Shan Taoist hermitage - Tien Shan Nei Kung

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Posted (edited)

This forum is one of the few places with members who are looking for true systems of Taoist cultivation and so I am here to offer a once secret system that is a rare and powerful system of spiritual cultivation.

 

This is an unknown system of nei kung from an unknown master, from a hidden lineage.  However, it is the case that the masters that stay in the shadows, the ones that don't commercialize, are frequently the ones that are the more advanced and powerful, partly due to the following, written by Chuang Tzu.

 

The Tower of the Spirit

The Spirit has an impregnable tower
Which no danger can disturb
As long as the tower is guarded
By the invisible Protector
Who acts unconsciously, and whose actions 
Go astray when they become deliberate,
Reflexive, and intentional.

The unconscious
And entire sincerity of Tao
Are disturbed by any effort
At self-conscious demonstration.
All such demonstrations 
Are lies.

When one displays himself
In this ambiguous way
The world storms in
and imprisons him.

He is no longer protected
by the sincerity of Tao.

Each new act
Is a new failure.

If his acts are done in public,
In broad daylight,
He will be punished by men.
If they are done in private
And in secret,
He will be punished
By spirits.

Let each one understand
The meaning of sincerity
and guard against display.

He will be at peace
with men and spirits
and will act rightly, unseen,
in his own solitude,
in the tower of his spirit.”

 

Thomas Merton, The Way of Chuang Tzu.

__________________________

 

Due to this dilemma I have always been conservative in the claims I've made about Tien Shan Chi Kung, which is actually Nei Kung, as taught to me by a most advanced and powerful Taoist wizard (chi kung master) and kung fu master.  This type of training requires a lot of individual attention and therefore the number of students in each practice session must be kept rather small.

 

I'm not doing this for me actually, since I like living like a hermit, alone on a big giant mountain, with just the wife here;  I'm doing this because I like to share something amazing and real, and I know there are some people who are willing to learn a demanding Way just for the sake of being part of something advanced.  I'm doing it because my master told me to teach.  My kung fu brothers who know this system don't teach it because it's demanding to invest the time and chi required, because they are busy doing other things and want to keep their chi power for themselves.

 

If you have any questions feel free to ask =)

 

Here are some links:

 

Home page:  http://www.tienshan.net/index.html

 

My primary teacher, who was also Bruce Lee's primary teacher:  http://www.tienshan.net/yueng.html

 

Some of my other teachers:  http://www.tienshan.net/teachers.html

 

Information about the hermitage:  http://www.tienshan.net/guidelines.html

 

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Edited by Starjumper
edit to correct spelling mistake
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Posted (edited)

Here is one email I got from someone after their first class, someone who had done a lot of meditation before and is sensitive to energy:

 

Dear Steve and Yolanta

 

Thank you so much for your hospitality.

 

Sorry i am writing several days after we met..... Steve qigong was just amazing

I felt my aura twice the usual size.... woke up feeling my etheric energy vital and stronger, like about 8 years ago.

First day....really profound Insights... consciousness held deep in the body.... 

 

I found it astonishing that one lesson has done so much for me....i know a little form called 5 yin... i had 5 days to learn it..... it does very little.... where is the magic? Why what u showed me is so powerful?

 

I felt very connected UP....but not so grounded...was this by design? I am very curious..

 

Oh....Daren said :  Steve is a Jedi... :)

 

With gratitude

 

Olga

__________________

 

Comments:   Yes it was by design.  It has a strong effect because the teacher radiates a lot of energy while teaching, something most chi kung teachers can not do, and wouldn't do if they could.  Also the teacher does energy work on the student during the sitting meditations.

Edited by Starjumper

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Here is another message I got from a couple after their first class:

 

We both had an unusual night after the neikung the other day. You were in my dream and placed your hands over the lymphatic nodes over the psoas muscles on my hip. Streams of energy was flowing from you to these areas.

 

My girlfriend was experiencing intense heat that was cultivating from within. In fact, when she watched the video from the link you sent me, she immediately had the same sensation activated.

 

Whether this has any corrleation to the exercises we practiced or whether it was just the mind/body processing tid bits of information relating to the day is beyond the scope of my ability to discern. Either way, my teacher always taught me to pay no heed to this. Just let the process do its thing and stay focused.

 

We would be delighted to simply go through the very basic techniques in the next lesson, combined with a meditation which we can practice everyday. Like this we can slowly but surely start cultivating qi and observe how it affects us.

 

See you next Friday

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So, if people experience this kind of thing after one practice you may imagine how it can lead to some real positive results after 6 months, and even more after six years!

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Posted (edited)

Here is a video that was made around three years ago.  The place is much greener and with more trees, fruit trees, flowers, vegetables, and plantings, and the retreat center is a now finished.  This was made for crowdfunding, which didn't help much, and so it has taken a long time to get the center looking decent but it still needs some finishing touches, like a fireplace in the main room for chillly nights.  I need to make a new video that is more up to date.  Enjoy.

 

 

If anyone does want to contribute then it will help because we still need materials to build some nicer guest housing.

Edited by Starjumper
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Looks beautiful. A lot of people talk about going and setting up on a mountain top, but it's cool to see that you've actually gone through with it.

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Thank you Aeran, my primary goal for coming here was survival, following my political views, which are 'Run for the hills' but since I'm a teacher that comes with me wherever I go.  Even if no serious students come it's a damn fine place to live.

 

By the way, I edited the first post to make it more user friendly  :)

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Posted (edited)

I found an article written by a master Pak Dong Sun, which was very poorly translated into English and so I have edited it quite a lot to make it clear in addition to removing parts that did not apply to the subject at hand:

 

Around 5000 years ago, Tien Shan monks, having reached the highest level of skill, were looking for like minded people and went South extending their knowledge.  This knowledge is popularly known these days as the Tibetan teachings of Bon, yet it has it's roots in Taoist chi kung from Tien Shan.  Bon is known as the most powerful school of magic and wonder in the world.  In it's original version Tien Shan was extreme, with the practitioners undertaking certain risks for the sake of attaining super powers.  When the Tien Shan monks reached Tibet they encountered the School of Bon, the strength of which was in it's methodology but the practice was rather weak.  From the unification of these two was born the strongest spiritual system of development of super human Characteristics.  

 

In the history of mankind the heritage of practices of Tien Shan has left a trace in the constellation of the brightest names of Enlightened Masters: Tilopa, Naropa, Marpa, Milarepa and Gambopy.  In The present, to answer the question of the origins of their spiritual mastery, Buddhist, Tibetan, and Nepalese lamas  claim that their “knowledge” originated in the place which is called “Jung-Jung”, “sheng-sheng”, “Tang-sheng” but those names are from different Himalayan dialects which mean the same in Chinese – Tien-Shan!  Even the mythical country of Shambhala is a particular place of the same name in the Tien Shan mountains, if translated from the local dialect means “mountain spring”or “wonderful source”.  In our time a place of beauty, and an amazing ski resort.

______________________________

 

'Master' Pak goes on to say that there are very few practicing Tien Shan teachers in the world and that for Asian teachers the tradition to not teach foreigners the true practices have not changed.  He says that he is not like this but in fact he does not teach the Tien Shan Chi Kung system, instead he says he teaches a system which he invented which is derived from some parts of Tien Shan mixed with other systems, however the videos of his which he shows contain nothing of Tien Shan techniques and instead are what I call wimpy chi kung; wimpy chi kung being ones that are primarily calisthenics or stretching and contain but little serious energy work.  This point brings us to why you may be in luck.  I, being a westerner, am not like most Asian teachers in that I truly want to give as much as possible of the pure Tien Shan techniques to serious students, and I was lucky to learn these from a most rare Chinese master who sincerely wanted the same for his very few students.

 

He only speaks of Himalayan teachers, but there is a Tien Shan chi kung master in China who is reportedly head of the lineage.

Edited by Starjumper

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What does the training actually consist of, and what are the basic mechanisms by which it functions, if you don't mind pandering to my curiosity :P

 

And I noticed you labelled it "nei kung" in the thread title, but 'chi kung" in your posts. Are you using the two interchangeably, or are they references to different parts of the system?

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I use chi kung and nei kung interchangeably.  I began by calling it chi kung and always use that term.  In the beginning I had no idea what I was getting in to and didn't find out that we were doing nei kung till a few years after we started.  My teacher liked for us to figure stuff out for ourselves (the sage teaches without speaking).  He spoke Cantonese and he called it Hei Kun, so if anyone knows how to translate that go ahead.  He also knew some things called Jeet Kun and Shen Kun  =), both of which were blended into his Tien Shan Chi Kung

 

As far as I'm concerned nei kung is a subset of chi kung, it is a type of chi kung, and since many people haven't heard much of nei kung I frequently use chi kung, although I'm using nei kung more now as I find that more people have heard of it, and here on this forum where it is common knowledge it needs to be pointed out what it really is.  My concept of nei kung is that it is the Path or the Wizard, and I heard and owned that term before I had heard of nei kung.  Some people define nei kung differently and say it is some kind of simplistic exercise that's mainly breathing?  I don't know, but it sure doesn't turn you into a wizard.

 

So ya, Tien Shan Chi Kung is Nei Kung. 

 

I'll answer the first part of your question tomorrow, I got back late tonight after taking the wife to dinner in town for International Women's Day and the highway over the two mountain passes had turned into a boulder strewn rapids in a torrential rainstorm, in the dark, with big rocks crossing the highway.

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I use chi kung and nei kung interchangeably.  I began by calling it chi kung and always use that term.  In the beginning I had no idea what I was getting in to and didn't find out that we were doing nei kung till a few years after we started.  My teacher liked for us to figure stuff out for ourselves (the sage teaches without speaking).  He spoke Cantonese and he called it Hei Kun, so if anyone knows how to translate that go ahead.  He also knew some things called Jeet Kun and Shen Kun  =), both of which were blended into his Tien Shan Chi Kung

 

As far as I'm concerned nei kung is a subset of chi kung, it is a type of chi kung, and since many people haven't heard much of nei kung I frequently use chi kung, although I'm using nei kung more now as I find that more people have heard of it, and here on this forum where it is common knowledge it needs to be pointed out what it really is.  My concept of nei kung is that it is the Path or the Wizard, and I heard and owned that term before I had heard of nei kung.  Some people define nei kung differently and say it is some kind of simplistic exercise that's mainly breathing?  I don't know, but it sure doesn't turn you into a wizard.

 

So ya, Tien Shan Chi Kung is Nei Kung. 

 

As far as I know hei kung is qi gong 氣功 in Mandarin. Back in the 70's in Chinese martial arts people talked more about waigong 外功vs. neigong 內功 external vs internal martial arts. Jeet kun sounds Jeet kune do 截拳道 the type of martial art Bruce Lee promoted back in the 60's.

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Posted (edited)

As far as I know hei kung is qi gong 氣功 in Mandarin. Back in the 70's in Chinese martial arts people talked more about waigong 外功vs. neigong 內功 external vs internal martial arts. Jeet kun sounds Jeet kune do 截拳道 the type of martial art Bruce Lee promoted back in the 60's.

 

 

Thank you, I scrood up, my teacher, Mr. Yueng, spoke Mandarin, not Cantonese,.  

 

He taught Bruce a from called Jeet Kun, and Bruce like that name so he used it to describe his stuff but added Do on the end to appeal to all the karate types.  That's because, when Bruce was living with Mr. Yueng and learning from him, karate was about the only martial art known and practiced in the US.  They were horrified at the crudeness and stupidity of karate and wanted to show the West how cool kung fu is.  Since they both had their origins in the same Chinese opera they had the idea of getting Bruce into the movies, which was the new opera, so that Bruce could demonstrate the kung fu that he learned from Mr. Yueng.

 

Mr. Yueng did not teach Shen Kun to Bruce, and Bruce didn't know about it.  Shen Kun is the Jedi stuff, which was included in our chi kung training.  Mr. Yueng did not teach chi kung to Bruce, and he did not teach kung fu to me, although the basics of it were also embedded in the chi kung training.   I learned the kung fu from some of Mr. Yueng's other kung fu students, one or two of which I suspect was more advanced than Bruce.

Edited by Starjumper

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Posted (edited)

What does the training actually consist of, and what are the basic mechanisms by which it functions, if you don't mind pandering to my curiosity :P

 

 

The training consists of moving exercises, sitting in chair exercises, and meditation, which is normally done sitting in a chair.

 

The moving exercises last about an hour in the beginning and longer as it evolves.  Each of the exercises contains some or many techniques, and the exercises change and evolve slowly over a period of years.  Some of them take on added movements which are added as layers overlaying the original simple movement and others simply change little by little in order to cover all the variations.  Later some movements are dropped and others take their place but there isn't too much of that.  In this way we learn thousands of techniques, and it is up to the student to explore how these exercises affect their energy.  All the exercises contain stretching, strengthening, energy work, and meditation all at once.  It is very concentrated and efficient in it's use of time, because there is a long way to go and everything is focused on cultivating as much chi power as fast as possible.   Comparing other types of chi kung to these methods is what led me to invent the term 'wimpy chi kung', and so much chi kung is so wimpy it's a downright sin!  Some types of martial chi kung, like some types of Bagua chi kung are not wimpy.

 

This type of chi kung is at the extreme end of the spectrum of 'internal' and softness in the internal arts.  Some types of chi kung are what we would call hard style, or are more like calisthenics and stretching than energy work.  Some types of chi kung that contain energy work focus 'out there' and not on your body and so for cultivating chi power they are wasted as far as I'm concerned.  In Tien Shan your hands are the energy 'tools' which do the work and the focus of the work is on your body.  Don't let the word 'soft' mislead you.  Soft means with utmost relaxation, but the exercises can be very strenuous, how strenuous we make them depends on the strength of the student, but the focus on strengthening is essential, and relaxed strength and good muscle tone are essential for vitality, and vitality is essential for cultivating chi power.  That bears repeating don't you think.

 

Relaxed strength is essential for vitality and vitality is essential for chi power.

 

Just considering the physical and not the energy aspect of Tien Shan, it can be used to become a world class athlete, like an Olympic athlete.  In fact it does the same to your energy.

 

Tien Shan nei kung is one of the few dedicated Taoistst spiritual paths, and it is a spiritual path of the warrior, it is also and exercise system for warriors, and addresses all aspects of physical development needed by martial artist, from the ability to move extremely fast to psychic and energy sensing abilities, allowing one to sense the intent and location of another, even in the dark.

 

As the system evolves the standing exercises last for longer and longer, until at one point they take as much as two and a half hours, later, towards the end, that time reduces and there is more sitting meditation.

 

Later I'll discuss the sitting exercises and the many hundreds of meditations which all focus on chi power and how they build upon each other.

Edited by Starjumper
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That's interesting, thanks - I'm always fascinated by learning about how different cultivation systems work. 

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Posted (edited)

Bruce Lee"s primary teacher supposed to be the Ip Man, taching him wing chun ... Right?  

Edited by Jox

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Posted (edited)

Bruce Lee"s primary teacher supposed to be the Ip Man, taching him wing chun ... Right?  

 

Ip Man was Bruce's high school teacher, and his only known teacher, certainly not his main teacher.  Mr. Yueng was also Bruce's uncle and his mentor.  This is something I wrote earlier to explain the details:

 

Mr. Yueng asked me to not write about him until after he passed away, and I was hoping it would be much later, as late as possible. One of the most advanced Taoist masters in the world recently passed away at the age of 97 (2012), he was a true wizard of the Taoist kind, like a powerful Jedi, his energy was vast and sparkled, and he had a joy that was contagious.

 

Let me start by clarifying some information about Mr. Yueng's connection to Bruce Lee. Most people think Yip Man was Bruce's teacher, and he was - his high school teacher. However Bruce also had a university level teacher, so to speak, and that was Mr. Yueng. Bruce lived with him for three years upstairs in a fancy chinese restaurant where Mr. Yueng was a cook, and was his student for a total of around eight years. Mr. Yueng did not want people to know he taught Bruce because he didn't want people challenging him to fights or bothering him for lessons. Bruce liked it too because then he got to say he made it all up. Mr. Yueng also did not want Yip Man to lose face, because Mr. Yueng's kung fu brother, Bruce's dad, was friends with the Yip Man family. This is the reason that Mr. Yueng asked me to not write about him until he passed away.

 

Mr. Yueng taught Bruce a kung fu form called Jeet Kun, and what Bruce taught didn't have a lot to do with that form, he just liked the name, he added Do to the name to appeal to the karate people. Bruce didn't know there was another higher level, named Shen Kun, which is the Jedi stuff, which Mr. Yueng taught to a few people later on.

 

Fook Yueng joined the Chinese opera when very young, around the age of ten, and the training they endured was brutal, much moreso than anything today. They had to get up at 4 in the morning and work out hard for two hours before even being allowed to use the restroom. The opera was divided into two parts, there were the singers, and then there were the martial artists. Fook was one of the martial artists and he was so good that he became the Monkey King. The Monkey King performance consists of the hero, the Monkey King, to run and jump and summersault through a group of three or four others who were all swinging sticks, spears and swords at him at the same time. At the same time he was taking away their weapons and then throwing them back. The Monkey King performance has to be the most advanced acrobatic performance that you will ever see. Bruce Lee's dad, Lee Hoi-Chuen, also joined the opera as a boy and was also the Monkey King, so Mr. Yueng and he were the closest of kung fu brothers. Kung fu brotherhood was taken very seriously because the opera was their family, and thus Fook was Bruce Lee's uncle.

 

The opera company was the Red Boat Junk Opera, and it consisted of a some boats, that were painted red, that traveled up and down the coast of China and it's rivers giving performances in the cities. When they got to a new city they were required to have a challenge fight between the hero of the boat and the hero of the city. If the city won the match then the opera had to pay taxes to the city, if not then they didn't. Some people were crippled and killed in these fights. Fook told me about a kick boxer on the boat whose legs were so strong that he could put the anchor over the side with his leg. This person had his Achiles tendon ripped off by and Eagle claw fighter, which probably made his career more difficult after that. Mr. Yueng was sometimes the boat's hero and he said no one could ever hit him, which implies that he never lost a fight.

 

Once their boat went to San Francisco to give an opera performance there, and that is when Bruce was born, making him a US citizen. It was at this time that Mr. Yueng decided to stay in the US because the Japanese had just invaded China and he didn't want to get involved in that, so he jumped ship and remained in the US.  After awhile he moved to Seattle, Washington, where he lived for the rest of his life.

 

One interesting note about the Red Boat Junk opera is that their form of Wing Chun, which was a softer.more internal, style than you see these days, was outlawed by the Chinese government. That was because the opponents of the Qing Dynasty used the Red Boat Opera Company as a cover to disguise themselves as a troupe of traveling entertainers. Their identities as Chinese opera performers provided a cover for martial arts training; however, the flashy moves of opera style martial arts were not suited to the activities of espionage and assassination, which required specialized skills. Even though assassinations themselves would be carried out using poison or knives, their targets were usually protected by bodyguards who, on discovery of an intruder, would seize the person, call for help, and disable the person to be held for interrogation. Therefore, according to this hypothesis, Wing Chun was designed to deal with an opponent who seized rather than struck and to silence that opponent immediately. This would explain certain technical aspects of Wing Chun, such as its emphasis on close-range combat and its many strikes to the throat and diaphragm.

 

At a memorial for Bruce in Seattle Mr. Yueng started crying and saying he died too soon, too soon ...

Edited by Starjumper
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Posted (edited)

image.png

 

Edited by Starjumper
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Hi Steve,

 

Yes, "heigong" is simply the Cantonese pronounciation of 氣功 which is qigong in Mandarin.

 

For anyone wondering about the claims of Master Yeung and Bruce Lee;

 

https://tinyurl.com/zvmgpvx

 

"One very old friend of Bruce's, in fact his mentor who I understand remembers Bruce from being a very young man, and a Seattle friend. Is Mr Fook Yeung." Linda Lee Caldwell (Bruce's Widow)

 

I have only heard good things about Master Yeung, and I spoke with an old student of another well thought of Gongfu teacher who knew Gao Fook and who respected him a lot.

 

Best,

 

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Posted (edited)

Ip Man was Bruce's high school teacher, and his only known teacher, certainly not his main teacher.  Mr. Yueng was also Bruce's uncle and his mentor.  This is something I wrote earlier to explain the details:

 

Mr. Yueng asked me to not write about him until after he passed away, and I was hoping it would be much later, as late as possible. One of the most advanced Taoist masters in the world recently passed away at the age of 97 (2012), he was a true wizard of the Taoist kind, like a powerful Jedi, his energy was vast and sparkled, and he had a joy that was contagious.

 

Let me start by clarifying some information about Mr. Yueng's connection to Bruce Lee. Most people think Yip Man was Bruce's teacher, and he was - his high school teacher. However Bruce also had a university level teacher, so to speak, and that was Mr. Yueng. Bruce lived with him for three years upstairs in a fancy chinese restaurant where Mr. Yueng was a cook, and was his student for a total of around eight years. Mr. Yueng did not want people to know he taught Bruce because he didn't want people challenging him to fights or bothering him for lessons. Bruce liked it too because then he got to say he made it all up. Mr. Yueng also did not want Yip Man to lose face, because Mr. Yueng's kung fu brother, Bruce's dad, was friends with the Yip Man family. This is the reason that Mr. Yueng asked me to not write about him until he passed away.

 

Mr. Yueng taught Bruce a kung fu form called Jeet Kun, and what Bruce taught didn't have a lot to do with that form, he just liked the name, he added Do to the name to appeal to the karate people. Bruce didn't know there was another higher level, named Shen Kun, which is the Jedi stuff, which Mr. Yueng taught to a few people later on.

 

Fook Yueng joined the Chinese opera when very young, around the age of ten, and the training they endured was brutal, much moreso than anything today. They had to get up at 4 in the morning and work out hard for two hours before even being allowed to use the restroom. The opera was divided into two parts, there were the singers, and then there were the martial artists. Fook was one of the martial artists and he was so good that he became the Monkey King. The Monkey King performance consists of the hero, the Monkey King, to run and jump and summersault through a group of three or four others who were all swinging sticks, spears and swords at him at the same time. At the same time he was taking away their weapons and then throwing them back. The Monkey King performance has to be the most advanced acrobatic performance that you will ever see. Bruce Lee's dad, Lee Hoi-Chuen, also joined the opera as a boy and was also the Monkey King, so Mr. Yueng and he were the closest of kung fu brothers. Kung fu brotherhood was taken very seriously because the opera was their family, and thus Fook was Bruce Lee's uncle.

 

The opera company was the Red Boat Junk Opera, and it consisted of a some boats, that were painted red, that traveled up and down the coast of China and it's rivers giving performances in the cities. When they got to a new city they were required to have a challenge fight between the hero of the boat and the hero of the city. If the city won the match then the opera had to pay taxes to the city, if not then they didn't. Some people were crippled and killed in these fights. Fook told me about a kick boxer on the boat whose legs were so strong that he could put the anchor over the side with his leg. This person had his Achiles tendon ripped off by and Eagle claw fighter, which probably made his career more difficult after that. Mr. Yueng was sometimes the boat's hero and he said no one could ever hit him, which implies that he never lost a fight.

 

Once their boat went to San Francisco to give an opera performance there, and that is when Bruce was born, making him a US citizen. It was at this time that Mr. Yueng decided to stay in the US because the Japanese had just invaded China and he didn't want to get involved in that, so he jumped ship and remained in the US.  After awhile he moved to Seattle, Washington, where he lived for the rest of his life.

 

One interesting note about the Red Boat Junk opera is that their form of Wing Chun, which was a softer.more internal, style than you see these days, was outlawed by the Chinese government. That was because the opponents of the Qing Dynasty used the Red Boat Opera Company as a cover to disguise themselves as a troupe of traveling entertainers. Their identities as Chinese opera performers provided a cover for martial arts training; however, the flashy moves of opera style martial arts were not suited to the activities of espionage and assassination, which required specialized skills. Even though assassinations themselves would be carried out using poison or knives, their targets were usually protected by bodyguards who, on discovery of an intruder, would seize the person, call for help, and disable the person to be held for interrogation. Therefore, according to this hypothesis, Wing Chun was designed to deal with an opponent who seized rather than struck and to silence that opponent immediately. This would explain certain technical aspects of Wing Chun, such as its emphasis on close-range combat and its many strikes to the throat and diaphragm.

 

At a memorial for Bruce in Seattle Mr. Yueng started crying and saying he died too soon, too soon ...

I met my chi kung master, Fook Yueng, over twenty years ago. Master Fook Yueng was one of a small and secret group of five of the world's most powerful/advanced Chi Kung masters from China. From him I learned Tien Shan Chi Kung, taught as a full system of Taoist internal alchemy. Fook Yueng was truly one in a million, He was in a class completely above the other masters and grand masters I've known and studied with. He was a powerful healer with healing abilities bordering on the miraculous, he had a bright energy that sparkled, his joy was contagious, and his psychic abilities and vast chi power were amazing. He was a true Taoist wizard. He was one of the world's most advanced martial artists, uncle, primary teacher and mentor to Bruce Lee. In a way, it is nice to know that Bruce Lee's main teacher was a powerful wizard.

Fascinating history, and thank you for preserving it and some of his system.  How did you come to meet him, btw?  Happenstance, or were you intentionally seeking teachings of his ilk out?

 

And could you give us some anecdotes of his amazing qi/healing/martial arts/psychic abilities?

 

I mean for a common reference point here, how would he stack up against "John Chang," for instance?

Edited by gendao
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Posted (edited)

Fascinating history, and thank you for preserving it and some of his system.  How did you come to meet him, btw?  Happenstance, or were you intentionally seeking teachings of his ilk out?

 

 

I became interested in life energy (chi) gradually in my thirties, I don't know what prompted it but I suppose it was past life stuff coming to the surface.  I guess I was lucky in finding teachers, at first I found this Aikido teacher in a nearby town who had some Jedi abilities, which were interesting to observe, but the training was just basic Aikido and at one point while tumbling I did it wrong and injured my shoulder.  They guy was kind of a nut of the big ego variety, and liked to show off.  Anyway I dropped out of his class and was looking around in Seattle, I found a Chinese kung fu master who advertised down town and went to observe one of his classes in Chinatown.  He didn't teach, some of his students did, he stayed in the back counting the money.  I found out much later he wasn't a master either, he was a fake.  

 

Then one day I happened to be walking through a city park in North Seattle and I saw these two guys practicing some push hands and kung fu applications.  At that time I knew nothing about tai chi or Taoism or kung fu.  I asked them about this teacher in Chinatown, and they told me that could be a mistake and it had FAIL written all over it, but as politely as possible.

 

It turned out that one of the guys was a tai chi teacher, Andy Dale, and he gave me his business card, in fact he was one of the more advanced Caucasian tai chi teachers one could hope to meet.  The other guy was Dave Harris, one of the top 0.01% of the best of the best kung fu people in the country and an adopted son of Mr. Yueng, my eventual chi kung teacher.

 

After a few months of Andy's business card lying around I decided to go visit one of his classes and it looked fun enough, so I started tai chi.  I thought tai chi was great because it required so much concentration and careful observation, which were interesting new activities for me.  Later I discovered it was also plenty of exercise.  I had never exercised or stretched before, I thought that stuff was for sissies or dummies, but I found out that you can get some good exercise while also exercising your mind.  I payed careful attention in class and I practiced a lot at home so I learned tai chi really well, to the point that Andy said I should teach.  

 

Earlier I had heard of Mantak Chia and gone to one of his seminars.  For some reason I wanted to be a chi kung teacher (past life stuff) and so since Chia was the only game in town, or in the country, I told him I wanted to go to one of his one week whirlwind teacher training seminars in New York, and he told me that first I should do tai chi for a year and then ask him again, which is why I ended up learning tai chi.

 

After being with Andy for a couple of years I got invited to his birthday celebration at a Greek restaurant,  While we were waiting around outside the restaurant I noticed a rather short slender Chinese man standing there with his wife.  He was wearing a real fine dark blue suit with a blazingly bright white shirt and tie, while the rest  of us were mostly wearing bluejeans an sweat shirts.

 

After we went into the restaurant I ended up sitting across the long table from the Chinese man.  He didn't speak English and so his wife acted as translator.  I wanted to tell them that I wanted to learn Iron shirt chi kung from a teacher in New York so I went and asked Andy how I should explain that.  Andy said:  "He's the most advanced kung fu master on the West coast, he was Bruce Lee's teacher".  I didn't know or care anything about Bruce but I thought it was really cool to be talking to a real master.  Later he gave me his business card and it had the business title of:  "Chinese Chi Kung Research Institute", and his title was "Master in Chi Kung".  I thought that was cool getting a card from a real master (I didn't know Andy was a real master too).  So I kept going to tai chi class, and Mr. Yueng's wife also went to Andy's tai chi class.  I still thought Iron Shirt chi  kung from Chia was the 'thing' and so at one point I gave Chia's book on Iron Shirt to her so that Mr. Yueng could look at it.  She brought the book back the following week and told me Mr. Yueng said it was a bunch of unrelated stuff that someone had thrown together.  Since Mr. Yueng was so psychic that he was effectively omniscient he would have known that Chia was a scammer and a fake, and I guess they couldn't stand the idea of throwing me to the dogs like that.

 

Later Andy told me in private that Mr. Yueng was accepting students, and I didn't know he meant me, and it took me a month or two to build up the nerve to tell Mr. Yueng's wife that I would like to try out to be his student.  I was told that Mr. Yueng's wife talked him into teaching chi kung and he decided to try it.  Originally he just wanted to teach Chinese but all the Chinese were only interested in chasing after the almighty dollar and were not interested in anything spiritual.  I think I was Mr. Yueng's first chi kung student, and that possibly they had me in mind as motivation for him teaching, since he had touched me at the restaurant he would know about me and past life stuff. plus his wife would have told him that I learned these art's very well.

 

Gendao asks if it was happenstance or if I was seeking teachings of his ilk.  The answer is that I was not seeking teachings of his type, in fact I had absolutely no clue as to what I was getting into nor that he was a most powerful Taoist wizard.  I had learned Mt. Omei chi kung from Andy, which is more of a physical, calisthenic/stretching type of chi kung so I assumed it would be something like that.  However Mr. Yueng's chi kung was done much more slowly and the movements had a sort of primeval, mystical beauty to them.  They seemed to pull at the strings of a subconscious animalistic way of moving and the focus was much more on working with energy, with the hands being the energy tools and the body being the subject of the energy work.  I didn't know it was nei kung, and I didn't know he was a powerful wizard, it was a friend who told me I was on what is called "The Path of the Wizard" and I thought that was cool but I had no interest in enlightenment or immortality or dragons.  I just thought it was fun doing the exercises and learning to feel energy.  I figured that since he was the most advanced master I was ever going to meet I would just do what he did, and Andy said something to me that was the best advice I ever got:  "watch him like a hawk".  I was with him for around eight years and then he retired and kicked us all out, which is what a real master is supposed to do.  To let you sink or swim on what you had learned and what you had retained.  Mr. Yueng had told me to start teaching after I was only with him for six months and that was a real challenge, but it helped me retain a great deal because I was able to progress my class as his system progressed through it's thousands of techniques.

Edited by Starjumper
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I became interested in life energy (chi) gradually in my thirties, I don't know what prompted it but I suppose it was past life stuff coming to the surface.  I guess I was lucky in finding teachers, at first I found this Aikido teacher in a nearby town who had some Jedi abilities, which were interesting to observe, but the training was just basic Aikido and at one point while tumbling I did it wrong and injured my shoulder.  They guy was kind of a nut of the big ego variety, and liked to show off.  Anyway I dropped out of his class and was looking around in Seattle, I found a Chinese kung fu master who advertised down town and went to observe one of his classes in Chinatown.  He didn't teach, some of his students did, he stayed in the back counting the money.  I found out much later he wasn't a master either, he was a fake.  

 

Then one day I happened to be walking through a city park in North Seattle and I saw these two guys practicing some push hands and kung fu applications.  At that time I knew nothing about tai chi or Taoism or kung fu.  I asked them about this teacher in Chinatown, and they told me that could be a mistake and it had FAIL written all over it, but as politely as possible.

 

It turned out that one of the guys was a tai chi teacher, Andy Dale, and he gave me his business card, in fact he was one of the more advanced Caucasian tai chi teachers one could hope to meet.  The other guy was Dave Harris, one of the top 0.01% of the best of the best kung fu people in the country and an adopted son of Mr. Yueng, my eventual chi kung teacher.

 

After a few months of Andy's business card lying around I decided to go visit one of his classes and it looked fun enough, so I started tai chi.  I thought tai chi was great because it required so much concentration and careful observation, which were interesting new activities for me.  Later I discovered it was also plenty of exercise.  I had never exercised or stretched before, I thought that stuff was for sissies or dummies, but I found out that you can get some good exercise while also exercising your mind.  I payed careful attention in class and I practiced a lot at home so I learned tai chi really well, to the point that Andy said I should teach.  

 

Earlier I had heard of Mantak Chia and gone to one of his seminars.  For some reason I wanted to be a chi kung teacher (past life stuff) and so since Chia was the only game in town, or in the country, I told him I wanted to go to one of his one week whirlwind teacher training seminars in New York, and he told me that first I should do tai chi for a year and then ask him again, which is why I ended up learning tai chi.

 

After being with Andy for a couple of years I got invited to his birthday celebration at a Greek restaurant,  While we were waiting around outside the restaurant I noticed a rather short slender Chinese man standing there with his wife.  He was wearing a real fine dark blue suit with a blazingly bright white shirt and tie, while the rest  of us were mostly wearing bluejeans an sweat shirts.

 

After we went into the restaurant I ended up sitting across the long table from the Chinese man.  He didn't speak English and so his wife acted as translator.  I wanted to tell them that I wanted to learn Iron shirt chi kung from a teacher in New York so I went and asked Andy how I should explain that.  Andy said:  "He's the most advanced kung fu master on the West coast, he was Bruce Lee's teacher".  I didn't know or care anything about Bruce but I thought it was really cool to be talking to a real master.  Later he gave me his business card and it had the business title of:  "Chinese Chi Kung Research Institute", and his title was "Master in Chi Kung".  I thought that was cool getting a card from a real master (I didn't know Andy was a real master too).  So I kept going to tai chi class, and Mr. Yueng's wife also went to Andy's tai chi class.  I still thought Iron Shirt chi  kung from Chia was the 'thing' and so at one point I gave Chia's book on Iron Shirt to her so that Mr. Yueng could look at it.  She brought the book back the following week and told me Mr. Yueng said it was a bunch of unrelated stuff that someone had thrown together.  Since Mr. Yueng was so psychic that he was effectively omniscient he would have known that Chia was a scammer and a fake, and I guess they couldn't stand the idea of throwing me to the dogs like that.

 

Later Andy told me in private that Mr. Yueng was accepting students, and I didn't know he meant me, and it took me a month or two to build up the nerve to tell Mr. Yueng's wife that I would like to try out to be his student.  I was told that Mr. Yueng's wife talked him into teaching chi kung and he decided to try it.  Originally he just wanted to teach Chinese but all the Chinese were only interested in chasing after the almighty dollar and were not interested in anything spiritual.  I think I was Mr. Yueng's first chi kung student, and that possibly they had me in mind as motivation for him teaching, since he had touched me at the restaurant he would know about me and past life stuff. plus his wife would have told him that I learned these art's very well.

 

Gendao asks if it was happenstance or if I was seeking teachings of his ilk.  The answer is that I was not seeking teachings of his type, in fact I had absolutely no clue as to what I was getting into nor that he was a most powerful Taoist wizard.  I had learned Mt. Omei chi kung from Andy, which is more of a physical, calisthenic/stretching type of chi kung so I assumed it would be something like that.  However Mr. Yueng's chi kung was done much more slowly and the movements had a sort of primeval, mystical beauty to them.  They seemed to pull at the strings of a subconscious animalistic way of moving and the focus was much more on working with energy, with the hands being the energy tools and the body being the subject of the energy work.  I didn't know it was nei kung, and I didn't know he was a powerful wizard, it was a friend who told me I was on what is called "The Path of the Wizard" and I thought that was cool but I had no interest in enlightenment or immortality or dragons.  I just thought it was fun doing the exercises and learning to feel energy.  I figured that since he was the most advanced master I was ever going to meet I would just do what he did, and Andy said something to me that was the best advice I ever got:  "watch him like a hawk".  I was with him for around eight years and then he retired and kicked us all out, which is what a real master is supposed to do.  To let you sink or swim on what you had learned and what you had retained.  Mr. Yueng had told me to start teaching after I was only with him for six months and that was a real challenge, but it helped me retain a great deal because I was able to progress my class as his system progressed through it's thousands of techniques.

Nice story, thanks! :)

 

Hehe, yea that seems to often be the case for Chinese teachers.  Those who relish teaching, often don't have much to teach.  And those with a lot to teach, would rather just practice their art and are more reluctant to teach (unless goaded or guided to).  So when they do, it's often on a temporary basis at their convenience.  Not a steadfast rule of course, but common enough to notice...

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Posted (edited)

Before you write for someone to be scammer and a fake ... you should think ...

 

  Edited by Jox

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Hi Starjumper

You  asked me with pm, to remove my previous post. You wrote, that you know it trough your personal experience, right?

Now, if I go with Socrates filter on ... because I practice Michael Winn stuff, which is derived out of Chia stuff, right? Your comment is quite not useful for me, it is not good and it is your personal experience/truth ...

 

It is not my point to derail you thread in any way, I just responded to some "hostile" words to make balance ... ;) 

 

Good chi to you ...  :) 

 

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Posted (edited)

Thank you.  However you continue to derail the thread, it is good to see you can write more than half a line.

 

I didn't bring up Chia, you did, and I hope Michael is more ethical.  Since you brought up the name Chia and mentioned my comments that are not useful I can understand, I'm sorry because I didn't mention any details.  Instead let's see if you find the truth useful.  Let me start by saying that Chia is a real nice guy ... to people who are paying him.

 

I've seen one of the human wrecks caused by his ignorance and greed, and heard of others, that is unacceptable in my lineage.

 

I've also seen two of Chia's students who came to my city to live with a Taoist teacher of mine for less than two weeks in order to learn about his system of healing.  They took notes and the basics, and two months after they left a brightly colored book with pretty pictures is published about this exact same system, and guess who's name was on the book as being the author?  Yep, it was Money Grubber himself.  He is known to be a plagiarist.

 

We may surmise that others of 'his' books were written in the same manner, and I consider that to be highly unethical.  In fact he never was a real master and now he's calling himself a grand master.  His tai chi stinks and his energy methods are weak and not safe.

 

So tell me Jox, do you find truth useful?

 

In any case, I wish you good luck in your practice.

Edited by Starjumper
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... he would have known that Chia was a s###### and a f###, and I guess they couldn't stand the idea of throwing me to the dogs like that.

 

I didn't bring up Chia, you did ... Your sentence ... Now, I am done ...  :ph34r: 

 

Thank you for good luck in practice ...   :) 

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