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Rene Descartes 

was a drunken fart ;

"I drink, therefore I am."

Doesn't matter,  In my youth I was a drunken fart now and again.

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Well, if there really is a parallel between Sartre and Buddhism its no wonder I could read Sartre. I couldn't read Buddhism either.

LOL you should try it in the original french..!

 

8)

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Freedom is limited by identity.

 

There are two categories of question regarding freedom--metaphysical and ethical. The latter is what usually concerns us.

 

In this Aristotle is helpful. Ethically, what we want to know is whether acts are coersed from external sources or initiated internally by rational processes.

 

In existentialism, a volitional agent always has freedom of choice because no external force can literally control your actions. Even when constricted by logic or circumstance a volitional agent always has the final say and is never compelled to act in a way external processes demand or imply. Even not acting is a free choice that can monkey-wrench a logical steamroller.

 

8)

Edited by Astral Monk
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Freedom is limited by identity.

 

8)

 

Freedom is limited by sensitivity.  Or as Wittgenstein put it, "You can't have a toothache in my tooth."

 

Identity is created by sensitivity.  What my fingers feel while typing this is not shared by the keys they press.  The keyboard has no sensitivity and consequently no identity.  No identity, no freedom.  Freedom is a function of sensitivity whose optimal point falls somewhere between the extremes of feeling nothing and feeling everything.  

 

Also sprach Taomeow.

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I have always enjoyed Paris whenever I had the chance to go there.

 

I can't go there now because I don't have a passport.  Oh well.

 

Its not so nice these days under Hollande. The wealthy have fled to London due to high taxes. I think London is now the fifth largest French City. We used to drive over every year for holidays. It was a great place to go fast on the bikes too, but not now. When we go down to Germany or Italy we avoid it completely. Then there are the camps of refugees in every port and terminus to contend with. Europe is going down the plug hole.

 

If we had a time machine we could go back 20 years and it would be great.

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I mean CET.I mixed up the dates. On Sunday September 6th.

 

Thanks for clarifying :)

 

And I think CET is 5 hours ahead of EST in the US?

 

I am just recommending that this chatroom be used and you just give a date and time.

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I found A Comparative History of World Philosophy from the Upanishads to Kant by Ben-Ami Scharfstein a particularly helpful book back in the days when I was educating myself in philosophical thought..... 

 

"A Comparative History of World Philosophy presents a personal yet balanced guide through what the author argues to be the three great philosophical traditions: Chinese, European, and Indian. The book breaks through the cultural barriers between these traditions, proving that despite their considerable differences, fundamental resemblances exist in their abstract principles. Ben-Ami Scharfstein argues that Western students of philosophy will profit considerably if they study Indian and Chinese philosophy from the very beginning, along with their own. Written with clarity and infused with an engaging narrative voice, this book is organized thematically, presenting in virtually every chapter characteristic views from each tradition that represent similar positions in the core areas of metaphysics and epistemology. At the same time, Scharfstein develops each tradition historically as the chapters unfold. He presents a great variety of philosophical positions fairly, avoiding the relativism and ethnocentrism that could easily plague a comparative presentation of Western and non-Western philosophies."

 

http://www.amazon.com/Comparative-History-World-Philosophy-Upanishads/dp/0791436845

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That sounds like it would be a pretty good read.

 

He also explored the psychology of the philosophers themselves in The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature of their Thought.......

 

"This highly readable volume offers a broad introduction to modern philosophy and philosophers. Ben-Ami Scharfstein contends that personal experience, especially that of childhood, affects philosophers' sense of reality and hence the content of their philosophies. He bases his argument on biographical studies of twenty great philosophers, beginning with Descartes and ending with Wittgenstein and Sartre. Taken together, these studies provide the beginnings of a psychological history of the philosophy of the period. Scharfstein first focuses on the philosophers' efforts to arrive at the objective truth and to persuade themselves and others of its existence. He then explores truth and relevance, both proposing the broadening of the traditional philosophical conception of relevance and considering philosophers' need to create something that belongs to and transcends them as individuals."

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Nungali, Nungali, speakers Nought?,

Has Humour in 'em,

Who'd have Thought !!! ;)

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Nungali, Nungali, speakers Nought?,

Has Humour in 'em,

Who'd have Thought !!! ;)

 

Nungali Bashing.

Ne'er out of fashion. 

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well the name is "Basher" !! ;)

Are you getting your self confused with someone else?

 

You are in England - Nungali is down under.

 

Or maybe it is I who is confused.

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I believe Nungali is / was a Language from Australia, thought to be extinct.

I have absolutely nothing against them, I was just trying (and obviously failing) to be humorous. ;)

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I believe Nungali is / was a Language from Australia, thought to be extinct.

I have absolutely nothing against them, I was just trying (and obviously failing) to be humorous. ;)

Oh, you succeeded in being humorous.  I was just trying to add confusion.

 

I didn't know that about the language.

 

I just did a quick search.  Yep.  It's all confusing.

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I was also trying to be humorous, and yes I used the name Basher in my feeble attempt in all its bashing glory.

 

Thanks for explaining what Nungali means.  Such a lilting word! 

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Anyone else have a thing for of Diogenes the Dog?

 

 

He's always had a semi taoist resonance for me... Urban and social hermit and beggar, considered so useless people would not even give him a simple task to help out protect their city, he did as he chose anywhere at any time and couldnt help himself from pulling philosophical practical jokes at the expense of silly people.

I think that to him, the vanity, idiocy and unnaturalness of society seemed so disrespectful towards its own parttaking members (correctly identified as joiners and reproducers of their despicable state) he just had to disrespect their every claim towards refinement and civilization. Out of respect for the neglected greatness and wisdom of their true nature, but thats just my own guesswork.

Teaching through example (and heckling) seems to have been his style.

The Bill Hicks of Sinope, Boss Dawg Diogenes. I sometimes re-read the english wiki article about him for inspiration and to put me in a better mood.

 

 

Spoiler alert, wiki-highlights follow

 

From Life of Diogenes: "Someone took him [Diogenes] into a magnificent house and warned him not to spit, whereupon, having cleared his throat, he spat into the man's face, being unable, he said, to find a meaner receptacle."

Edited by Rocky Lionmouth
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Anyone else have a thing for of Diogenes the Dog?

 

 

He's always had a semi taoist resonance for me... Urban and social hermit and beggar, considered so useless people would not even give him a simple task to help out protect their city, he did as he chose anywhere at any time and couldnt help himself from pulling philosophical practical jokes at the expense of silly people.

I think that to him, the vanity, idiocy and unnaturalness of society seemed so disrespectful towards its own parttaking members (correctly identified as joiners and reproducers of their despicable state) he just had to disrespect their every claim towards refinement and civilization. Out of respect for the neglected greatness and wisdom of their true nature, but thats just my own guesswork.

Teaching through example (and heckling) seems to have been his style.

The Bill Hicks of Sinope, Boss Dawg Diogenes. I sometimes re-read the english wiki article about him for inspiration and to put me in a better mood.

 

 

Spoiler alert, wiki-highlights follow

 

From Life of Diogenes: "Someone took him [Diogenes] into a magnificent house and warned him not to spit, whereupon, having cleared his throat, he spat into the man's face, being unable, he said, to find a meaner receptacle."

 

:D

 

I don't know much about him except the usual stories, but that spitting feat reminded me of someone I used to be know a long time ago. 

 

This girl's boyfriend always tried to shape her to his specs.  He wanted her to be prim and puritanical but also sexy as hell, but also in a way that commands only chaste attitudes, but also makes everybody want her, and so on, you get the picture.  Wear this, don't wear that.  Hair too short, let it grow out, too long, get a haircut.  No smoking, no booze except when I say let's have some.  No makeup.  You're wearing lipstick, you look better without any makeup, can you please wipe it off?  The girl said, oh, no problem, and wiped it off on his white dress shirt.  "Unable to find a meaner receptacle." 

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