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Ya Mu

Heavenly Choir of Tao

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I love listening to Heavenly music and often hear it. Have you heard this choir?

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Sometimes when I'm a passenger in a car, and my door window is slightly open, it is if I can hear a symphony of music in the wind. It is almost as if I am creating the music in my head, or steering the music, but with an uncanny creativity. Then at times the music becomes so clear I have to look around to see if it is not a car radio somewhere, and it never is.

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The symphony of nature:

 

 

 

 

P.S. That recording of 'slowed down crickets chirping' posted in the original post here in this thread was supposed to have been made by a guy named Jim Wilson, and it appears that it must be very carefully processed and tuned and layered crickets sounds to artificially make it sound like a choir singing. There's more info here:

http://www.snopes.com/critters/gnus/cricketsong.asp

 

I did some experimenting slowing down cricket chirps in audio software to different speeds and it doesn't sound at all much like what is in that recording.

 

Here is an example of someone who tried the same thing, and although a bunch of crickets chirping slowed down has some similarities at certain speeds, it really still doesn't sound like the 'musical choir' singing in that recording by Jim Wilson. It would seem there was definitely a lot of extra audio processing going on there, if that is really even crickets at all... :)

The very first speed this guy slows the crickets down to does sound a bit choir like. With some careful tuning and editing and layering and manipulating it could maybe sound a lot more like a musical choir. ;)

http://soundcloud.com/darangatang/dawkins_chorus_of_crickets

Edited by NotVoid

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I listen to the choir every night, Ya Mu. :)

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Very few recordings released anywhere today are not processed. And I was aware that one was (I am an acoustical engineer) - but still thought it pretty awesome. Listen to it for what it is without trying to put it down and you may find it very meditative. But yes, if people only knew what their favorite music stars really sounded like without all the processing there may not be as many fans. But I am a fan of crickets, and like Brian, listen to them every night. I can sometimes hear the heavenly music even when I am not listening for it.

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http://wafflesatnoon.com/gods-cricket-chorus/

 

Right the cricket's chorus is a manipulated recorded - reminds me of the "flea's circus" back in the day....

 

But as a launching point into "biomusic" I would say it is right on.

 

I just enjoyed the return of the catbird to our forest - same bird year after year. Quite a treat. Cutting my mushroom spawn into a birch tree I downed with the catbird regaled me with mimicry songs from its hoary past of tropical fun.

 

 

Biomusicology is a new science discipline based on the empirical evidence of animals and plants using the same acoustic structures for communication as humans.

 

http://www.biomusic.org/index2.html

 

http://www.academia.edu/2552080/Is_birdsong_music_Evaluating_harmonic_intervals_in_songs_of_a_Neotropical_songbird

 

Is birdsong music? Evaluating harmonic intervals in songs of a Neotropical songbird

 

So this is a fascinating 2012 study - new to me.

 

Essentially the nightingale is used as the bird with the most frequency based songs - and yet these songs were not tied to the harmonic series as frequency.

 

The basis for that was the pentatonic or diatonic or chromatic - the final, admittedly, not being as close to real harmonics as integers.

 

But all three scales were ruled out as greater than random for the nightingale and therefore for any other bird as well since most birds use more complex tones than a frequency based song.

 

But I think the attunement to biomusic has more to do with the nonlinear alchemy of sound - the overtones create a subharmonic relaxation - the same way that a Tibetan monk does throat singing by meditation relaxation of the vagus nerve which enables the throat to vibrate - autonomic nervous system relaxation.

 

Birds do the same thing - their throats can vibrate better and therefore create multiple frequencies at the same time just like a human throat singer - so Western scientists would be completely unfamiliar with the secret - subconscious - attraction to bird song.

 

So I search biomusic throat singing and get interesting results.

 

 

A – this vowel is used for the respiratory system, thus we direct the sound to the chest. The areas affected are the lungs, bronchi and pleura;

E - we use the vowel E for the communication system, directing it towards the throat. The areas affected are the larynx and thyroid and parathyroid gland;

I– the vowel I is used for the nervous and immune systems. The sound must be directed to the head, especially towards the nose root. The areas affected by this vowel are the brain and pituitary and pineal glands;

O– for the circulatory system we use the vowel O, directing the sound towards the centre of the chest. The areas involved are the heart and the thymus;

U– this vowel is used for the digestive system. The sound is directed towards the navel. The areas affected are the liver, stomach, pancreas and intestine.

 

I wonder how much this aligns with the Taoist healing sounds..... but it makes sense to me.

 

Just as Ohm Mani Padme Hum covers the whole body - why - because of these same vowel changes!

 

http://en.benessere.com/psychology/articles/biomusic.htm

 

The other term for this is "acoustic ecology"

 

Yeah so the main concept in that field is that in ecology all the frequencies are used as adaptive niches - so that a healthy ecology has this wide range of frequencies. When there is urban noise it prevents animals from communicating in their adapted frequency signal.

 

Conversely this is probably why the "wall of sound" style in human music with a wide range of frequencies is considered very appealing aesthetically.

 

 

"Many types of frogs and insects vocalize together in a given habitat so that no one individual stands out among the many. This chorus creates a protectively expansive audio performance inhibiting predators from locating any single place from which sound emanates. The synchronized frog voices originate from so many places at once that they appear to be coming from everywhere. However, when the coherent patterns are upset by the sound of a jet plane as it flies within range of the pond, the special frog biophony is broken. In an attempt to reestablish the unified rhythm and chorus, individual frogs momentarily stand out giving predators like coyotes or owls perfect opportunities to snag a meal"

 

biophony as sonic camouflage

 

http://www.acousticecology.org/wildlandbiology.html

 

 

Through my field work, I discovered that in undisturbed natural environments, creatures vocalize in relationship to one another very much like instruments in an orchestra. On land, in particular, this delicate acoustic fabric is almost as well-defined as the notes on a page of music when examined graphically in the form of what we sometimes call voice prints. For instance, in healthy habitats, certain insects occupy one sonic zone of the creature bandwidth, while birds, mammals, and amphibians occupy others not yet taken and where there is no competition. This system has evolved in a manner so that each voice can be heard distinctly and each creature can thrive as much through its iteration as any other aspect of its being. The same type of event also generally occurs within marine environments. This biophony, or creature choir, serves as a vital gauge of a habitat's health. But it also conveys data about its age, its level of stress, and can provide us with an abundance of other valuable new information such as why and how creatures in both the human and non-human worlds have learned to dance and sing. Yet, this miraculous biophony - - this concerto of the natural world - - is now under serious threat of complete annihilation. Not only are we moving toward a silent spring, but a silent summer, fall and winter, as well. "

 

So yeah there is a deeper meaning to this.

 

 

 


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Not to the elemental devas singing at the same time as crickets do :) but certainly listening to crickets, frogs, bees, trees, etc. is already a heavenly gift., especially when meditating or dwelling amongst sacred rocks:

 

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Edited by Gerard
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The first video ya mu posted is blocked here in Germany due to licensing issues. Bizarre...

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I walked past a suburban tree once where there were about 3 tree frogs sitting. I've studied African poly-rhythms, and let me tell you, they were jamming. Actually sounded a lot like the intro about 20 seconds into this:

 

 

 

Another time I was in Barbados where they have singing frogs. I was enjoying the patio at the place I was staying and realized something deep about the nature of tempo and syncopation by listening to them. I could tell they were responding when I started to jam along a bit.

 

Birds too. Definitely some syncopation communication happening there too.

 

(for folks not sure what syncopation refers to, count 1&2&3&4AND!1&2&3&4AND! to get the idea. The AND is the syncopated beat)

Edited by Harmonious Emptiness

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