Jox

Buddha Palm Qi Gong

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Max said something very similar once

 

Max, Kunlun ...?

 

You probably think of hand seals / mudras. Am I right?

Are the hand seals and hand mudras one and the same stuff?

 

As I remember, when I attended Cosmic Healing seminar by Mantak Chia, he said, that when we practice and channel force trough the fingers we activate our organs, meridians and influence our brains also.

 

 

Jox, :)

Edited by Jox
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The complete Buddha Palm qi gong set is in details explained in Qigong empowerment. The sequences are slightly different, as on the YT clips, but it is in fact the same stuff. Interesting ... :)

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Max, Kunlun ...?

 

You probably think of hand seals / mudras. Am I right?

Are the hand seals and hand mudras one and the same stuff?

 

As I remember, when I attended Cosmic Healing seminar by Mantak Chia, he said, that when we practice and channel force trough the fingers we activate our organs, meridians and influence our brains also.

 

 

Jox, :)

Finally returned to this thread :lol: Yes, yes, and yes. And good link, too. Lin showed me a set similar to that, with the fingers and all :)

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I have a question for anybody on this thread.

 

In my shamanic healings, the energy is run through the hands and it feels that the energy of both bodies (yours and the healee) have 'joined', as though there's no sense of separation at all. There is a wonderful sense of tingliness all over my body; but the oddest thing that is developing more and more is this magnetic pull in my abdomen when I am doing this consciously. This is when I know the energy is "running".

 

Is this similar to how the energy feels when doing a Qigong healing?

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Finally returned to this thread :lol: Yes, yes, and yes. And good link, too. Lin showed me a set similar to that, with the fingers and all :)

 

Finger bending method and sequences are unique to the

and is the heart of the sucessful practice.

 

... ;)

Edited by Jox
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ok, I can't resist (a great & funny film, if you haven't seen it- Kung Fu hustle):

 

Heaven force down to earth, pure magic ... :P

Edited by Jox

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Some additional info for Kong Jing -  practice I found here:

 

  • Five elements stake.
  • One finger zen dynamic form.
  • One finger zen static form.
  • Shaolin Nei Jin Qi Gong.

Interesting that this practice is used in Tibetan Qi Gong as fundation practice ...  :)

 

 

post-52082-0-53114000-1436802427_thumb.jpg

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I learned that set a few yeas ago, but I have really begun with it since one year ago. It is really simple practice, but really powerful stuff ...

 

If anyone does this practice, it would be nice if, he/she liked to share their experiences ...

 

 

Best, Jox ...   :)

Edited by Jox

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So Mantak Chia teaches buddha palm/Cosmic qigong, this is also taught as kong jing gong. This comes from Shaolin Nei Jin Yi Zhi Chan which has three levels, the above mentioned is sort of a mix, perhaps with some Emei influence.

 

I practice nei jing gong, luohan gong, kong jing gong and five hands of poison, all of which belong to Shaolin Nei Jin Yi Zhi Chan.

 

It's an enjoyable style with lots of potential, most important, it fits me.

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Hi Mudfoot ... yes, seems all those sets are derived out of Shaolin Nei Jin Yi Zhi Chan, with addition from Emei and some others Qi Gongs ... Shaolin Nei Jin Yi Zhi Chan originaly supposed to have up to 500 arhats / postures ..., but the core are the finger bending stuffs I suppose know ...

 

What is your experience with nei jing, kong jing? How long have you been doing them?

Five hands of poison? I have never heard of them till now ... what are they for? 

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Some additional info for Kong Jing -  practice I found here:

 

  • Shaolin Nei Jin Qi Gong.

 

I knew that before, it was mentioned by some authors ...  but nobody explained it ...

In the book Shaolin Nei Jing Qi Gong, detailed information is presented, how do we bend the toes on the feet, at the same time, as we bend fingers on the hands ... 

 

Realy simple, but seems quite some time will be needed to get feeling in to the toes and bend one by one at the same time with the fingers ...  ;)

Edited by Jox

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I have been doing them from 2000.

Nei jing gong have a handfull of finger sequences in the extended palm stance. Luohan gong have 16 more, slightly more difficult, stances. Then kong jing gong and five hands of poison are practiced parallel.

In the process, you learn to do external Qi healing, get to feel your aquired meridians and their associated organs, open the eight extraordinary vessel, work with the three dantian and so on. There is also, depending on which dynamic movement your teacher uses, a chance to work with the five elements. Some martial practice is also part of the tradition.

Edited by Mudfoot
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If you download the book Training methods of 72 arts of Shaolin, you will find a description of both the Nei Jin Yi Zhi Chan and Five hands of poison.

You will not recognise the Yi Zhi Chan described there as the practice taught from the heritage of the southern tradition. Neither do I find more than a shadow of resemblance in the Five hands of poison.

This can be for several reasons.

1) There is a huge difference between Songshan Shaolin and the southern tradition, with the southern tradition developing in the line of health and spiritual practice while the northern focusing on the martial side.

2) The line of teachers from the southern tradition choose to mainly (only) teach the health/spiritual side publicly. 

3) The author of the above mentioned book had a good laugh while sitting and drinking with his friends, and made up things to fill up the book alternately changed things as to not reveal actual secrets while still boosting interest in the Shaolin tradition.

 

I know for a fact (well, it's part of tradition lore...) that option no 2 is true, for the other ones, I cannot tell.  

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Mudfoot, if you dont mind ... where and from who did you learn those methods?

Edited by Jox

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