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interesting drawing

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Three Han Dynasty Tombs at Ma-Wang-Tui
David D. Buck
World Archaeology, Vol. 7, No. 1, Burial (Jun., 1975) , pp. 30-45

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Check out this banner with a crow.

 

http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/wuhung/files/2012/12/Xiwangmu-the-Queen-of-the-West.pdf

 

The association to XIwangmu with birds and crows show up in art... even with the 3 legged crow.

 

http://www.art-and-archaeology.com/china/xian/fs02.html

 

The Queen Mother Of The West And The King Father Of The East

Eastern Han Dynasty
Beilin Museum, Xi'an

This Han Dynasty tomb relief provides a fascinating glimpse into the early, pre-Daoist, myths and legends of ancient China. A sun circle appears on the right, with a symbolic flying crow inside the medallion. In front of the sun medallion, the King Father of the East, Dongwangfu, sits upon his throne, a sun chariot, driven by a kneeling charioteer who holds the reins of three crows. The movement throughout is from east to west, consistent with the natural motion of the sun from dawn to dusk. In front of the sunbirds, a human-like figure flies or races above a tiger. Next is seen a frog, symbol of the moon; the hare, another moon-symbol; and then a pair of moon-hares, who pound out the elixir of immortality in a crucible, above a fox.

On the left, the seated Queen Mother of the West, Xiwangmu is adored by birds, including a three-legged crow, and officials. To her left is a moon circle in which are inscribed a symbolic deer and frog (closeup). The resident goddess of Mount Kunlun, Xiwangmu was later promoted to a major role in the pantheon of Daoist Immortals.

 

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Edited by dawei
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It is interesting how the crow drawing is so large in relation to the other figures and the drawing is separated by a boundary.

Scary, even.

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Crows tend to be linked to death. A flock of crows is called a murder.

Tidbit 2, A flock of ravens is an unkindness !

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Crows tend to be linked to death. A flock of crows is called a murder.

Tidbit 2, A flock of ravens is an unkindness !

the image of a crow in a tomb does suggest a connection to death.

but there are also other things it could be representing.

i am not so sure with the Crow that it is always so, er er black and white;

 

http://perspectiveszine.webnode.sk/news/ravens-and-crows-in-mythology-folklore-and-religion/

 

http://runelore.it/en/esotericism/ravens-and-crows.html

 

ah ah

 

there is also the silk painting that shows the postures for Tao Yin Shu

this set was the one held in high regard by the royal family, high enuff regard to have the set with them in the tomb

 

xin_590802011420301119781.jpg

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I am not so sure the crow in reference to this banner is an association of death... although the banner is Lady Li's journey of life and death and references to immortality with Xiwangmu at the top.


It is important to note the symmetry of the Crow on the right among the ten suns (Yang); Yi shot down nine one by one, and each turned into a Crow on the ground...


On the left is a crescent moon with (Yin) a toad.


Xixangmu sits inbetween them surrounded by animals...



Mu tian zi zhuan relates a poem sung by Xiwangmu:

"There are a multitude of tigers and panthers in the place where I live. There, crows and magpies also live together." This song supports the argument that Xi wang mu lived in the wilderness and was the mistress of beasts."
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