dawei

HHC study background and criticisms

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I'm glad I searched on Hua Hu Ching instead of starting a thread I might get my ass handed to me for it. :P Nah, just kidding... I don't think anyone here would do that. Anyhowzz... I stumbled across the HHC in my friendly local B&N and started flipping through it. I landed on chapter 47 which says:

 

Dualistic thinking is a sickness.

Religion is a distortion.

Materialism is cruel.

Blind spirituality is unreal.

Chanting is no more holy than listening to the

murmur of a stream; counting prayer beads no more

sacred than simply breathing; religious robes no

more spiritual than work clothes.

If you wish to attain oneness with the Tao, don’t get

caught up in spiritual superficialities.

Instead, live a quiet and simple life, free of ideas and

concepts.

Find contentment in the practice of undiscriminating

virtue, the only true power.

Giving to others selflessly and anonymously, radiating

light throughout the world and illuminating your

own darkness, your virtue becomes a sanctuary for

yourself and all beings.

This is what is meant by embodying the Tao.

 

This really strikes me. The reason is that I am becoming disillusioned with the 100s of pontifications, rules, regulations, do-s and don't-s, and general superstitious silliness (as I call it) of Hinduism. I'm beginning to go my own way and develop my own belief and devotional system. That may very well render me "non-Hindu", but what the hell. It's just a label. The verses above go hand-in-hand ("in my opinion", a phrase not used nearly enough on the internet ;)) with a paraphrase from the Buddha:

 

Do not believe in anything simply because you have heard it.

Do not believe in anything simply because it is spoken and rumored by many.

Do not believe in anything simply because it is found written in your religious books.

Do not believe in anything merely on the authority of your teachers and elders.

Do not believe in traditions because they have been handed down for many generations.

But after observation and analysis, when you find that anything agrees with reason and is conducive to the good and benefit of one and all, then accept it and live up to it.

 

The point is, apart from this post being nothing more than a brainfart and my desire to contribute nothing, er I mean something to discussions, I haven't read much more of the HHC, but if the rest is anything like that, I don't care who wrote it or what it's in response to. Wise words are wise words, if they fit one's paradigm, and so far that fits mine. If anyone cares.

 

That's all... flame on!

 

250px-Human_Torch.png

 

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I just got this recently and there's some good content in it! I read this thread and did some more research before reading it and I was surprised. It's welcome in my book collection and I hope to have some good discussions.

 

Edit: Though I can see how destructive it can be if one reads it and is unable to point out parts that the author of the TTC would never write.

Edited by woodcarver

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Edit: Though I can see how destructive it can be if one reads it and is unable to point out parts that the author of the TTC would never write.

I think I have done a fairly good job of doing this for others. Hehehe.

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I think I have done a fairly good job of doing this for others. Hehehe.

This should be interesting :)

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This should be interesting :)

Hehehe. Well, this is a topic that is dear to me and plus the fact that I am a Steward of these sub-forums I do try to read all posts and respond where appropriate.

 

I actually have no problem with the HHC nor with its contents. It is a very nice mix of Taoist and Buddhist thoughts. I'm sure everyone can learn something from it.

 

But to suggest that Lao Tzu wrote it is way off base. If there ever was a Lao Tzu he was already dead a couple hundred years before Buddhism entered China and the HHC was written.

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Hehehe. Well, this is a topic that is dear to me and plus the fact that I am a Steward of these sub-forums I do try to read all posts and respond where appropriate.

 

I actually have no problem with the HHC nor with its contents. It is a very nice mix of Taoist and Buddhist thoughts. I'm sure everyone can learn something from it.

 

But to suggest that Lao Tzu wrote it is way off base. If there ever was a Lao Tzu he was already dead a couple hundred years before Buddhism entered China and the HHC was written.

Yeah but even with buddhism and laolao aside, some of the stuff in there seems just odd. But hey, people in that era and place have probably studied the TTC more than I have.

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Yeah but even with buddhism and laolao aside, some of the stuff in there seems just odd.

You got that right, IMO!

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I think all the talk of the super enregy beings and other magnificent language is a way to lure people into taoism. I got into it because I wanted to harness this strange new energy force for my own personal gain and some of the talk in the TTC somehwhat sucked me in to that. If I knew that I would be here today focusing on chewing my food more, I would have thrown the TTC out the window.

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Unless I'm missing the energy beings???

No, you aren't missing anything. At least not from the Manifest.

 

But whatever brought you to Taoism is good, regardless of its silliness. Hehehe.

 

All belief systems have their attractors. This is why I will sometimes argue that Taoist Philosophy is not a belief system. I don't like it being associated with "religious" belief systems.

 

But still, yes, there are energy potentials that most aren't even aware of and only a few who have tapped into these energies. But they are not magical or mystical. They are natural energies that allow us, if tapped, to do things that we thought we would never be able to do.

 

This requires practice, practice and then more practice. Now, really, do we spend our life practicing or do we spend our life living? Most prefer living so never tap into those unknown energies. But those who have found a way to practice and live at the same time are the fortunate ones.

 

But no, don't look for magic in Taoist Philosophy. One needs to add to this in order to find magic. Taoist Shamanism is a valid place to look. (I don't do that.) And there are many other places as well.

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Agreed on the belief thing. I try not to believe anything ;)

 

I suck at qi gong and energy in general, can't quite funnel it into where I would like it to go but I'm starting to notice something going on. I also suck at the practice vs. life thing. It looks like some people just meditate to a certain point and then continue on with their lives. I can't say that I blame them but not thinking about irrelevant things in inappropriate situations is cool, too. I also like truth and stuff.

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Technique has a lot to do with it. If you are interested to see where you can go with this gain some knowledge of a number of different practices. Different practices work for some people but not for others. Maybe you just haven't found one that works for you yet.

 

Healing is another energy practice that is not only useful to one's self but helpful for others as well. You might want to look into that.

 

Anyhow, best wishes along your journey.

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