vivekji108

What is the best Qigong lineage to start out with?

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Hi all,

 

I'd like to learn Qi-gong but am confused as what kind of Qigong to start out with.

 

I'd like to start learning from books and videos and when the time is right continue under a master.

 

It seems to em that to go with the oldest methods...

 

Any suggestions as what path to follow? Any suggestions on books that might help me understand the workings of Qigong better?

 

Thanks in advance,

Vivek

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There is no "Best". But there are many different styles and teachers. Here's a list:

1. Spring Forest Qigong
2. Stillness Movement/Gift of the Tao
3. Flying Phoenix Qigong
4. Spontaneous Movement Neigong: Jenny Lamb


Those are the ones I remember at the moment as well as the ones I have heard the most positive things about. Best of luck to you.

My 2 cents, Peace

Edited by OldGreen
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For a complete beginner, something simple to learn would be your best bet.

Lam Kam Chuen's Zhan Zhuang would be a good start. Start slowly, practice daily and you will start to notice changes after 6 months.

8 Brocades is another very good system worth looking at.

I wouldn't try my favourite, Xing Yi Nei Gong until you have a solid foundation in martial arts or qigong. Even though it's awesome :D

Not strictly qigong forms, Five Tibetans and/or Yin Yoga are good choices also. Lots of videos for free online.

Have a poke around, see what takes your fancy and devote at least 6 months of regular (preferably daily), practice.

Good luck

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Thanks guys,

 

I just started looking at the 8 brocades and it feels good to me :)

 

Is it possible to start learning that from videos?

 

What kind off changes can you notice after 6 months of practice?

 

Vivek

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There is no "Best". But there are many different styles and teachers. Here's a list:

 

1. Spring Forest Qigong

2. Stillness Movement/Gift of the Tao

3. Flying Phoenix Qigong

4. Spontaneous Movement Neigong: Jenny Lamb

 

 

Those are the ones I remembers at the moment as well asjtheones I have heard the most positive things about. Best of luck to you.

 

My 2 cents, Peace

 

Big bump to this. That list is solid.

 

John

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Is it possible to start learning that from videos?

 

What kind off changes can you notice after 6 months of practice?

 

Vivek

 

It is probably one of the simplest forms to learn, so video/book learning applies here.

There are many varieties to this very underrated form. A lot of people are more attracted to supposedly high level practices. A good, solid foundation in 8 brocades will maybe be all you'll ever need.

6 months of practice should give resistance to infection type illnesses such as colds and flu.

The body starts producing it's own medicine.

Combine this with a meditation routine and you'll have an extremely effective practice that will serve you for the rest of your life.

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I'd add look around your area. Often a live experienced teacher who can give you feedback is worth more then a master on a video tape. As far as the video/book route goes consider doing some google and Youtube searches, you can find many of these teachers there and see if any connect to you. Keep in mind flashy often means little, in the chi gung game looks are often deceiving. When you find someone you like, get there stuff, preferably a little at a time and practice consistently.

 

I started out with Michael Winn's Healing Tao USA stuff. Solid courses and he had frequent seminars.

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Many thanks to everyone contributing their valuable information to me :)

 

At the moment I'm looking for some good books on Qigong as well that explain the deeper mysteries and some of the theoretical part and that as well serve as a source of inspiration..

 

So far I found:

 

The root of Chinese Qigong: secrets for health, longevity & enlightenment from Yang

 

Is that book worth getting? Any other books that you would recommend for me?

 

Thanks,

Vivek

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thats a great book. Qigong Empowerment is another good one for beginners.(forget the author at present but am pretty sure theres only one title by that name.. purple cover).

 

i second the notion that you should find a teacher. books can only do so much.

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Also try tai chi 18 form qi gong or shibashi. Its probably the most effective and yet simple qi gong form i have ever practiced

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Something slow with a holistic sequence including a warm up and closing.

 

I started with this sequence promoted by the National Qigong Association, and developed by Michael Winn. It has similarities to 8 section brocade, and movements that are common to different Tai Chi foundational qigong sets but organized for cleansing and replenishing rather than directed towards martial power and strength. It's sure to get the chi flowing through you and not lead to empty calisthenics, which will give you a good base for when you try other styles and movements.

Edited by Harmonious Emptiness
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Many thanks to everyone contributing their valuable information to me :)

 

At the moment I'm looking for some good books on Qigong as well that explain the deeper mysteries and some of the theoretical part and that as well serve as a source of inspiration..

 

So far I found:

 

The root of Chinese Qigong: secrets for health, longevity & enlightenment from Yang

 

Is that book worth getting? Any other books that you would recommend for me?

 

Thanks,

Vivek

 

I actually have this book and although it is probably a great book packed with information, I would not recommend it for beginners, it is just a lot to take in, I'd say a good reference book for the more experienced practioner.

It's actually standing on my book shelf most of the time so I speak from experience :) probably later on I might look into it more.

 

I can recommend Ken Cohen's THE WAY OF QIGONG:THE ART AND SCIENCE OF CHINESE ENERGY HEALING and Lam Kam Chuen's The way of energy.

 

Warm wishes

Edited by Thijs Buelens

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I'd recommend finding a teacher over any book, much less unlearning to do later. I have yet to meet a qigong teacher who actually recommends any of the books. Also none of the people I know who teach qigong would prefer a student who has learned from books over one who is just brand new.

 

If however you live in the middle of nowhere and there is not even a single qigong teacher (keep in mind all of the internal martial arts have some form of qigong in the series of practices as well), then any post standing exercises are the best to start in my opinion. Well OK best to keep doing all throughout your practice too. Those stand still be fit vids are actually pretty good, for non in person teaching.

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Personally, I'd steer clear of Falun Gong. The reviews I've seen of their qigong is that it is "nothing special". The organization seems quite controversial, some folks think it is a cult. I'm sure there are some pretty extensive discussions of Falun Gong elsewhere on Tao Bums.

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Personally, I'd steer clear of Falun Gong. The reviews I've seen of their qigong is that it is "nothing special". The organization seems quite controversial, some folks think it is a cult. I'm sure there are some pretty extensive discussions of Falun Gong elsewhere on Tao Bums.

I'd agree. Same goes for any meditation technique. There are points in the process where a person can become extremely willing and open to influence, especially if when meditation brings up more difficult material.

 

--2cts--

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I agree with much of what has been said, but would also add this: the "best" forms are the ones that you like to do and will practice on regular basis. When you first begin with a new form be sure to give it some time to reveal it's effects (they are not always immediately apparent). Traditional practice recommended doing a "100 Day Gong" when learning something new. I don't recommend jumping around from practice to practice too much when you're starting out. In my opinion, once you've established a core group of forms as a foundation, then you can rotate some things in and out of your practice sessions, or spend part of them experimenting with new pieces. Good luck and enjoy!

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LOL I'm still confused because there is so much to choose form :)

 

I always prefer the more simple, solid & oldest methods... I see soo much stuff that is just a variation of something else.

 

What would be the oldest most authentic form of qigong out there?

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LOL I'm still confused because there is so much to choose form :)

 

I always prefer the more simple, solid & oldest methods... I see soo much stuff that is just a variation of something else.

 

What would be the oldest most authentic form of qigong out there?

 

The microcosmic orbit aka small universe is considered the foundation for alchemy qigong practice -- I don't think it's the oldest -- but it is very effective for healing and building up energy.

 

I recommend the small universe practice c.d. -- follow along instructions -- http://www.springforestqigong.com/index.php/small-universe-30-min-cd

 

Sometimes I get a threat blocked on that link but then it goes away -- so I use free Avast! real time detection....

 

ummm.. I spose the SFQ tech guy hasn't noticed or something....

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microcosmic_orbit

 

Yeah I guess some claim it is real old...

 

http://www.scribd.com/doc/34350503/Lu-K-Uan-Yu-Taoist-Yoga-Alchemy-and-Immortality

 

That book takes the small universe in detail from the very beginning to the advanced alchemy levels.

 

http://www.scribd.com/doc/2672168/Mantak-Chia-Awaken-Healing-Energy-through-the-Tao

 

That's a great intro book on explaining the microcosmic orbit aka small universe.

 

So Wang Liping is a real great master teaching the small universe practice -- sometimes he comes to the U.S. I guess or to Europe but mainly teaches in China. http://wangliping.eventbrite.com/

 

 

Yeah I find the c.d. to be very helpful to guide the meditation.

 

O.K.! So I guess it's more of a practice rather than a lineage.

 

But usually at first you do more standing active exercises to build up the jing energy and then do more of the sitting passive meditation to build up the chi energy and shen.

 

But the small universe is considered a foundation practice so it's good at all levels of practice.

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LOL I'm still confused because there is so much to choose form :)

 

I always prefer the more simple, solid & oldest methods... I see soo much stuff that is just a variation of something else.

 

What would be the oldest most authentic form of qigong out there?

The most "beneficial" qigong is the one you DO

 

If you later find a "more authentic" / "better" version, AND the form you are practising (for some time) is not helping, then you can always give that one a go.

 

The only way to go "wrong" is not to start :)

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