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GrandTrinity

What movement Qi Gong forms have you memorized?

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Talking about non-stillness forms....

 

8 Brocade

5 Tibetan

Jesus sitting

Most of Grandmaster Zhang's teachings

Tai Chi Chi Kung 13 Yang style of Chia

Meridian Chi Kung by Dirk Oeillibrandt

Warrior Wellness

BK Frantzis Energy arts and Congress

Winn's stuff, about 85% of

most Iron Shirt 3 and morning practices of Chia

Im sure there is a couple others I'm forgetting....

 

And you? Everyone chime in, even if its ZERO, let us know?

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cool thread idea.

 

primordial chikung

5 Tibetans

intuflow

 

are the ones that I use regularly. And these are still in the vault:

 

the frolics

8 brocades

Winn's sexual chikung

standing postures/marrow washing progressions

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My former Tai Chi teacher said to use Grasp Sparrow's Tail on both sides as Qigong so I did and still do sometimes. I have not created the Dantien yet though so the only power I can emit as a result of this is probably due to mechanics. For some reason my rollback and I guess what you would call yin aspects of Tai Chi are really strong.

I have tried many of the above forms but have come to the conclusion that I can't learn the real thing from a book or tape. There is a human direct transmission aspect that is crucial to real qi practices for me anyway. Most of the effects I have experienced from the above practices is illusory or superficial.

I have yet to learn a genuine straight Qigong practice that works, from a genuine teacher with a genuine lineage.

Honestly I am sick of Qigong window shopping. Dabbling in loads of practices has left me with very little depth in any one practice. I think I dabbled because I had not found anything with depth enough for me to dive into. I am now probably as ready as I'll ever be to dive in to something effective and genuine.

Lucky for me and anyone else here who has a hankerin' for the real thing, it seems to be a possibility now.

Of course this is all just my perspective. Maybe you guys have produced real results with these practices. I don't know.

 

Maybe it would be good to list the reproducable results of your particular practice or combination of practices.

Edited by darebak

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Tai Chi teacher said to use Grasp Sparrow's Tail on both sides as Qigong so I did and still do sometimes.

 

I think this is wise. The foundational structure of Tai Chi is based on Wu Ji, a physical as well as metaphysical foundation exercise in Chinese Martial / Health Arts. Since we know that the paths between the 13 postures are found through following the bodies natural affinity for wu ji (relax and let gravity move you) it's safe to say that tai chi chuan can be an effective medium for the physiology associated w/ altered states of consciousness.

 

I know this is suppose to be an inventory list of what you know, but honestly I hate laundry lists on the internet, as there is a unhealthy trend arrising w/ information technologies of 'collecting' information. This trend is not embodiment of that knowledge, rather it's almost plagerism to me. I do want to share w/ the hearts of fellow seekers of the Tao, so if my post seems like it's tangental, it is slightly, yet still having to do w/ the practice of gung, and w/ the topics brought up in the thread...

 

"Maybe you guys have produced real results with these practices. I don't know.

 

Maybe it would be good to list the reproducable results of your particular practice or combination of practices."

 

I was going to ask this as well, Darebak beat me 1/2 way; is there was any one of these styles that on a daily basis reproducable results are experienced? Are there parrellels in these practices that mirror one another that are producing similar subjective or objective results?

 

It is my experience that by "trying" to reproduce experiences, they are kept out of grasp. So even though experiences of progress in the gung (work) show themselves in daily life, the mind can prevent those signs from re-surfacing when you 'try' to reproduce the phenomena. It's a paradox indeed, yet perhaps a 'safeguarding' mechanism of some type. At this point I must reassert my position that chi gung is not just about checking off a list of events. It's about checking your ego in at a your own door. Only then can you travel past your percieved limitations, and grow.

 

So how does one change their chi gung practice in order to explore past these phenomenolocal signs of progress in chi gung training?

 

There are a number of psycho-phsyiological signs that act as a road map during standing or moving meditation. These signs are not stillness or movement itself. They are simply signs pointing down the road of proper cultivation. They are reassurances that you are practicing chi (breath) gung (work). Many of the spontaneously experienced sensations of moving chi gung are experienced in stillness; since these phenomenon occur from a reverse perspective, or the movement of stillness.

 

I must emphasis that what is personally observable in stillness is really just a biofeedback tool to reassure you that practice is occuring. The observable phenomenon is not the goal, simply a marker.

 

"What is mind? No matter. What is matter? Never mind." - George Berkeley

 

Wu Ji is the standing posture most pratitioners of the chinese internal disciplines begin with. Wu Ji resembles a slight squat while hugging a tree. A Tai Chi practitioner may choose any of the 13 postures or 5 steps to spend time exploring stillness. For general chi gung practice, Wu Ji is the most common posture. It's known by various names such as Universal Post, Health Stance, Pile Stance, etc.

 

After standing any random period of time (dependent on the individual) you may experience the following.

 

These are all signs you are regulating & balancing the body and with practice they will pass.

 

1. Tightness localized anywhere in the body. (a reminder to relax and let your whole body do the work. Before you close the posture attempt to relax the area feeling tight. Unify that which is seperate.)

 

2. An increase in heart-rate and blood-flow to extremities. (more circulation to cells)

 

3. Deeper breathing cycles.

 

4. Blotchy hands/skin. Sweating and/or increase in skin oils. (increase in lymphatic & endocrine function)

5. Twitches or muscular palpitation.

 

6. Hot-Cold flashes.

 

7. Spontaneous correction of posture or re-allignment of structure.

 

8. Spontaneous emotions / inspiration.

 

9. Deep memory recall.

 

10. Withdrawal from extraneous mental activities.

 

These are all signs you are regulating & balancing the body and with practice they will pass.

Edited by Spectrum

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Honestly I am sick of Qigong window shopping. Dabbling in loads of practices has left me with very little depth in any one practice. I think I dabbled because I had not found anything with depth enough for me to dive into.

 

I know what you mean. However behind all the different forms there does seem to be some common themes: gathering energy, circulating energy, purifying energy, connecting personal energy to universal energy, storing energy etc. I suppose the key is to determine what a particular form is trying to do in relation to these.

 

As for real tangible results I think it depends on what the goals are of one's personal practice, martial, medical, spiritual or any combination of these. Apart from a subjective improvement in the quality of one's life having, someone in the know validate your results is a real blessing though hard to come by. This validation can come from unexpected sources not necessarily connected to chi kung circles such as healers and people with clairvoyance etc.

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Spectrum and Rex, love what you're saying.

 

I have tried many of the above forms but have come to the conclusion that I can't learn the real thing from a book or tape. There is a human direct transmission aspect that is crucial to real qi practices for me anyway. Most of the effects I have experienced from the above practices is illusory or superficial.

I have yet to learn a genuine straight Qigong practice that works, from a genuine teacher with a genuine lineage.

 

Darebak, I don't think I have any sort of concrete answer but here's what happened to me. I practiced tai chi and qigong for a number of years, with and without teachers. I worked with the forms daily until I was extremely familiar with them.

 

Then I went on a workshop with a 'genuine' teacher. Though all my teachers were genuine (no matter their level) this one was high level energy with transmissions. As a result, I can now sense, move, and do all kinds of interesting things when working with energy. My question: Was it my teacher who helped activate the ability to work with energy in me, or was it that during the workshop I realized 'everyone' there was doing this very thing with energy and so I should be able to do it too?

 

I've learned belief and intention *are* key.

 

Maybe it doesn't matter. In the end, all the time that I originally spent learning my forms was not wasted--because I know them so very well now that I can focus on the energy aspects.

 

As for real tangible results I think it depends on what the goals are of one's personal practice, martial, medical, spiritual or any combination of these. Apart from a subjective improvement in the quality of one's life having, someone in the know validate your results is a real blessing though hard to come by. This validation can come from unexpected sources not necessarily connected to chi kung circles such as healers and people with clairvoyance etc.

 

I just thought of one. LOL. Squirrels!

 

I do a qigong method where you pull energy up from the earth into the side channels and down again, using hands to direct. I was practicing outside, in nature, where nature was doing its thing. Where I'm from, young squirrels can be incredibly annoying as they barrage you with machine-gun-style chattering harrassment. One day a squirrel was so insistent while I was doing the movement I finally lobbed some qi at him. He shut up abruptly. Stared in shock. Then took off. LOL.

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Honestly I am sick of Qigong window shopping. Dabbling in loads of practices has left me with very little depth in any one practice. I think I dabbled because I had not found anything with depth enough for me to dive into. I am now probably as ready as I'll ever be to dive in to something effective and genuine.

Lucky for me and anyone else here who has a hankerin' for the real thing, it seems to be a possibility now.

Of course this is all just my perspective. Maybe you guys have produced real results with these practices. I don't know.

 

I think we all pass through this stage. Atr first, we're excited, and we're trying a lot of different things. Then we find that is approach does not lead to progress, and we begin to settle into a few things, a little older and wiser for the journey.

 

My results, overall, are a complete change in my life. When I started this path, I was bitter, angry, lonely and cynical, I was completely asleep, and my thoughts were out of control. I suffered from insomnia, restlessness, and bouts of depression. Now I am relaxed, happy, and married. I have broken my addictions to tv and smoking. I drink very little. I am rarely sick, need less sleep, and feel generally pretty good. I have become a better driver, incidentally, because I don't speed and don't really care if some one else wants to get ahead of me. I have learned that the universe is far bigger, and more mysterious, than I ever could have imagined. I can work a full day and come home and be with my family without being exhausted or drained. I'm no longer in a hurry most days.

 

I practice my tai chi form (Chen Man Ching Yang Short Form, single form practice), a few qigong techniques from Master Wong Kiew Kit (3 techniques total, 1 per sessions), and seated vipassana meditation.

 

I've tried many of these other techniques. They didn't work for me.

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I've memorised so many forms that it would take me a day to do them all once.

All Michael Winn's, couple of BK Frantzis, some of Zhizing Wang's, Dirk's basic Meridian forms, same Shaolin ones as forestofsouls, Eagle's claw, twin dragons chasing pearl, couple of tao yin forms.....

 

The only movements I now do are Sifu Yap's hexagram dance.

 

It is amazingly beneficial to do the same thing again and again and again. Three years now, on this apparently simple set, and I'm more of a beginner than when I started.

 

There is such a danger, when you have a basket of practices to pick from, that you think "now would be a great time to do some of this one" where actually you just needed to plough on with the same one. Can make it very easy also to be thinking what to do next, instead of being where you are.

 

If I could only pass on one piece of advice, it would probably be to pick one practice and ignore all the alternatives. How to choose it? No idea... :D

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Hmmm

 

setting aside comments about lists, etc, for now, here goes.

 

HT Iron Shirt - Embrace tree. dropped others long ago.

HT Six Healing Sounds. This one is IMO on the border between active and stillness form.

HT - Tai chi chikung - 13 movements.

Bagua - Basic circle walking 8 hand positions.

Hsing I - pi chuan (spelling?) standing position

Winn - Six Animal frolics

Winn - 8 Extraordinary vessels.

Winn - Primordial Chikung

Winn - deep earth pulsing. Very simple, but DEEP. the best kind.

also used to know but am now rusty with deep healing chikung and gods playing in cauldron but probably couldn't do them without reference at this point.

Winn - Pan gu chikung

Wu - Shamanic Tiger Chi kung

Wu - Fire Dragon chi kung

Wu - Five elements chi kung

Wu - Shamanic orbit chi kung

Wu - shaking (drumming and dancing). Used at the beginning of all forms, but can be used as a practice in and of itself.

 

There are others I have learned, and pieces of which I use from time to time. But these are the ones I could teach at least the outline of, which is an indication of a certain level of understanding.

 

Also, there are practices, or techniques which couldn't properly be called "Forms" but which are useful.

I am leaving them out because I have chosen a definition of form that makes sense to me. Listing Deep Earth Pulsing as a form is actually a bit of a stretch as this is really a simple technique. But it is deep enough on it's own to deserve a line.

 

This list is maybe shorter than I would have thought on first take. There must be others which are not coming to mind, but I think they wouldn't count as "memorized" in that case would they.

 

Darebak - Reproducible results? That to me is a strange question. My results will definitely NOT be anyone elses I would say.

How would my body, mind and spirit be without these practices??

 

Well, that's my input for now.

 

Craig

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Every day:

- Yang Taiji Long Form

- 5 Petal Plum Chi Kung

The rest of the time is spent on meditation.

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