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cherokee immortals

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It just so happens that I have a trip half-planned for a visit to Cherokee, NC next month (September).

 

I will be taking my Medicine Bag (presented to me by a part-Cherokee Medicine Woman) with me for cleansing.

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It just so happens that I have a trip half-planned for a visit to Cherokee, NC next month (September).

 

I will be taking my Medicine Bag (presented to me by a part-Cherokee Medicine Woman) with me for cleansing.

She must have thought very highly of you to present you with that. You may or may not know that Medicine Bags cannot be bought at any price.

 

As a realfastcat I have been told that across centuries and woven throughout the lore of many Peoples, the Lynx has long been recognized as a silent witness to the foils and follies of human kind, tufts of fur that sit atop the ears of a Lynx are thought to be the the antennas of wisdom from the Ancestors. They walk swiftly and lightly you often wont know they are there the power of the Lynx is the power to enter the souls of your loved ones silently and to help communication with the ones above.

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She must have thought very highly of you to present you with that. You may or may not know that Medicine Bags cannot be bought at any price.

 

As a realfastcat I have been told that across centuries and woven throughout the lore of many Peoples, the Lynx has long been recognized as a silent witness to the foils and follies of human kind, tufts of fur that sit atop the ears of a Lynx are thought to be the the antennas of wisdom from the Ancestors. They walk swiftly and lightly you often wont know they are there the power of the Lynx is the power to enter the souls of your loved ones silently and to help communication with the ones above.

 

Thanks for the thoughts.

 

She told me that my Spirit Guide is the Cougar. I guess that is pretty closely related to the Lynx. Also, my Medicine Stone is Turquoise.

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Other forums I have a practice of posting Once to any topic. More flow here it appears.

When I first signed up here the flow seemed Pyroclastic :lol:

 

Cougar is the ultimate lone hunter, representing coming into power. Silent and sly but strong and aggressive! The power of the cougar as the largest big cat in North America is asserting yourself! Take charge and make your own decisions! Though solitary animals the Cougar is respected for its cunning hunting skills and can help you to figure out your next plan of action in your life. Cougars think before action they plan ahead.

 

I have encountered twice in the wild a Cougar, here we call them Panthers. The first words that come to my

mind when I remember these encounters is Powerful and I was in Fear.

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Other forums I have a practice of posting Once to any topic. More flow here it appears.

When I first signed up here the flow seemed Pyroclastic :lol:

 

Cougar is the ultimate lone hunter, representing coming into power. Silent and sly but strong and aggressive! The power of the cougar as the largest big cat in North America is asserting yourself! Take charge and make your own decisions! Though solitary animals the Cougar is respected for its cunning hunting skills and can help you to figure out your next plan of action in your life. Cougars think before action they plan ahead.

 

I have encountered twice in the wild a Cougar, here we call them Panthers. The first words that come to my

mind when I remember these encounters is Powerful and I was in Fear.

 

Seems you have a fair handle on NA spirituality.

 

Yes, the Cougar goes by many names. Here in Florida they are referred to as panthers as well. I have never seen one in the wild. If I ever did I would hope that it would be gentle with me. Hehehe.

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The beauty of the trees, the softness of the air,

the fragrance of the grass speaks to me.

The summit of the mountain, the thunder of the sky,

The rhythm of the sea, speaks to me.

The faintness of the stars, the freshness of the morning,

the dewdrop on the flower, speaks to me.

The strength of the fire, the taste of salmon, the trail of the sun,

and the life that never goes away, they speak to me

And my heart soars.

chief dan george

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@realfastcat,

"She must have thought very highly of you to present you with that. You may or may not know that Medicine Bags cannot be bought at any price."

there are medicine bags and ceremonial pipes for sale. i agree in spirit , with what you are saying, in that one should never buy or make one of these for themself, but rather they are always meant to be given to another.

 

@Mh, "It just so happens that I have a trip half-planned for a visit to Cherokee, NC next month (September)."

i am hoping to be there the 3rd week of october.

 

 

@anamatva "how different from euro fairies and their legacy "

i find it interesting how primitive peoples no matter their geography all have narratives of very similar types of beings.

and how they are sometimes viewed differently.

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@Mh, "It just so happens that I have a trip half-planned for a visit to Cherokee, NC next month (September)."

i am hoping to be there the 3rd week of october.

 

Great! Do you have any NA ancestory? I don't.

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Great! Do you have any NA ancestory? I don't.

i am really quite the muttsmile.gif besides ancestors from different european "tribes"

i do have some NA ancestors. powhatan, pamunkey, and cherokee.

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@anamatva "how different from euro fairies and their legacy "

i find it interesting how primitive peoples no matter their geography all have narratives of very similar types of beings.

and how they are sometimes viewed differently.

 

oh yes sir something is going on, for sure

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i am really quite the muttsmile.gif besides ancestors from different european "tribes"

i do have some NA ancestors. powhatan, pamunkey, and cherokee.

 

Hey, mutts are good within a species. They provide diversity and prevent stagnation of the species.

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What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

Crowfoot - Blackfoot Chief

 

 

 

Because we are old, it may be thought that the memory of things may be lost with us, who have not, like you, the art of preserving it by committing all transactions to writing.

We nevertheless have methods of transmitting from father to son an account of all these things. You will find the remembrance of them is faithfully preserved, and our succeeding generations are made acquainted with what has passed, that it may not be forgot as long as the earth remains.

Kanickhungo - Treaty negotiations with Six Nations

 

 

 

Why should you take by force from us that which you can obtain by love? Why should you destroy us who have provided you with food ? What can you get by war ?

It is better to eat good meat, be well, and sleep quietly with my women and children; to laugh and be merry with the English, and be their friend; to have copper hatchets and whatever else I want.

King Wahunsonacook - Powhatan

 

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the real Hiawatha (not the one longfellow" immortalized") but the true Immortal Hiawatha

 

The slumber of Ta-ren-ya-wa-gon, Upholder of Heavens, was disturbed by a great cry of anguish and woe.He looked down from his abode to earth and saw human beings moaning with terror, pursued by horrifying monsters and cruel, man-devouring giants.Turning himself into a mortal, Ta-ren-ya-wa-gon swiftly descended to earth and, taking a small girl by the hand, told the frightened humans to follow him.By trails known only to him, he led the group of shivering refugees to a cave at the mouth of a great river, where he fed them and told them to sleep.After the people had somewhat recovered under his protection, Ta-ren-ya-wa-gon again took the little girl by the hand and led them toward the rising sun.The band traveled for many days until they came to the confluence of two mighty rivers whose waters, white with spray, cascaded over tremendous rocks. There Ta-ren-ya-wa-gon halted and built a long-house for himself and his people.For years they lived there, content and growing fat, their children turning into strong men and handsome women. Then Ta-ren-ya-wa-gon, the Sky Upholder became mortal, gathered the people around him and spoke: "You, my children, must now spread out and become great nations. I will make your numbers like the leaves of a forest in summertime, like pebbles on the shore of the great waters."And again he took one little girl by the hand and walked toward the setting sun, all the people following him.After a long journey they came to the banks of a beautiful river. Ta-ren-ya-wa-gon separated a few families from the rest and told them to build a long-house at that spot and found a village. "You shall be known by the name of Te-ha-wro-gah, Those-of-Divided-Speech," he told them, and they grew into the Mohawk tribe.And from the moment he had named them, their language changed and they could no longer understand the rest of the people.To the Mohawks Ta-ren-ya-wa-gon gave corn, beans, squash, and tobacco, together with dogs to help them hunt game. He taught them how to plant and reap and pound corn into meal. He taught them the ways of the forest and the game, for in that long-ago time, people did not yet know all these things.When he had fully instructed them and given them the necessities of life, Ta-ren-ya-wa-gon again took one little girl by the hand and traveled with the remaining people toward the sunset.

 

After a long journey they halted in a beautiful well-watered valley surrounded by forests, and he commanded another group to build their village at that spot. He gave them what was necessary for life, taught them what they needed to know, and named them Ne-ha-wre-ta-go, the Big-Tree people, for the great forests surrounding them.And these people, who grew into the Oneida nation, also spoke a tongue of their own as soon as he had named them.Then once more Ta-ren-ya-wa-gon took a little girl's hand and wandered on, always toward the setting sun, and the rest of the people followed him.They came to a big mountain which he named O-nun-da-ga-o-no-ga. At its foot he commanded some more families to build a long-house, and he gave them the same gifts and taught them the same things that he had the others. He named them after the mountain towering above them and also gave them a speech of their own. And these people became the Onondaga nation.

 

Again with a small girl at his side, Ta-ren-ya-wa-gon wandered on, leading the people to the shores of a lake sparkling in the sun. The lake was called Go-yo-gah, and here still another group built their village, and they became the Cayugas.Now only a handful of people were left, and these Ta-ren-ya-wa-gon led to a lake by a mountain called Ga-nun-da-gwa. There he settled them, giving them the name of Te-ho-ne-noy-hent - Keepers of the Door.They too received a language of their own and grew into the mighty Seneca nation.There were some among the people who were not satisfied with the places appointed to them by the Upholder of Heavens. These wandered on toward the setting sun until they came to a river greater than all others, a river known as the Mississippi.They crossed it on a wild grapevine that formed a bridge from bank to bank, and after the last of them had crossed over, the vine tore asunder. None could ever return, so that this river divided the western from the eastern human beings.

 

To each nation the Upholder of Heavens gave a special gift.

 

To the Senecas he gave such swift feet that their hunters could outrun the deer.

 

To the Cayugas he gave the canoe and the skill to guide it through the most turbulent waters.

 

To the Onondagas he gave the knowledge of eternal laws and the gift to fathom the wishes of the Great Creator.

 

To the Oneidas he gave skills in making weapons and weaving baskets.

 

To the Mohawks he gave bows and arrows and the ability to guide the shafts into the hearts of their game and their enemies.

 

Ta-ren-ya-wa-gon resolved to live among the people as a human being. Having the power to assume any shape, he chose to be a man and took the name of Hiawatha.

 

He chose to live among the Onondagas and took a beautiful young woman of that tribe for his wife. From their union came a daughter, Mni-haha, who surpassed even her mother in beauty and womanly skills.

 

Hiawatha never ceased to teach and advise, and above all he preached peace and harmony.

 

Under Hiawatha the Onondagas became the greatest of all tribes, but the other nations founded by the Great Upholder also increased and prospered. Traveling in a magic birch-bark canoe of dazzling whiteness, which floated above waters and meadows as if on an invisible bird's wings, Hiawatha went from nation to nation, counseling them and keeping man, animal, and nature in balance according to the eternal laws of the manitous. So all was well and the people lived happily.

 

But the law of the universe is also that happiness alternates with sorrow, life with death, prosperity with hardship, harmony with disharmony.

 

From out of the north beyond the Great Lakes came wild tribes, fierce, untutored nations who knew nothing of the eternal law; people who did not plant or weave baskets or fire clay into cooking vessels. All they knew was how to prey on those who planted and reaped the fruits of their labor.

Fierce and pitiless, these strangers ate their meat raw, tearing it apart with their teeth. Warfare and killing were their occupation.

They burst upon Hiawatha's people like a flood, spreading devastation wherever they went. Again the people turned to Hiawatha for help. He advised all the nations to assemble and wait his coming.

And so the five tribes came together at the place of the great council fire, by the shores of a large and tranquil lake where the wild men from the north had not yet penetrated.

 

The people waited for Hiawatha one day, two days, three days. On the fourth day his gleaming-white canoe appeared, floating, gliding above the mists. Hiawatha sat in the stern guiding the mystery canoe, while in the bow was his only child, his daughter.

 

The sachems, elders, and wise men of the tribes stood at the water's edge to greet the Great Upholder. Hiawatha and his daughter stepped ashore. He greeted all he met as brothers and spoke to each in his own language.

 

Suddenly there came an awesome noise, a noise like the rushing of a hundred rivers, like the beating of a thousand giant wings. Fearfully the people looked upward.

 

Out of the clouds, circling lower and lower, flew the great mystery bird of the heavens, a hundred times as big as the largest eagles, and when ever he beat his wings he made the sound of a thousand thunderclaps.

 

While the people cowered, Hiawatha and daughter stood unmoved. Then the Great Upholder laid his hands upon his daughter's head in blessing, after which she said calmly, "Farewell, my father."

 

She seated herself between the wings of the mystery bird, who spiraled upwards and upwards into the clouds and at last disappeared in to the great vault of the sky.

 

The people watched in awe, but Hiawatha, stunned with grief, sank to the ground and covered himself with the robe of a panther.

 

Three days he sat thus in silence, and none dared approach him. The people wondered whether he had given his only child to the manitous above as a sacrifice for the deliverance of his people. But the Great Upholder would never tell them, would never speak of his daughter or of the mystery bird who had carried her away.

 

After having mourned for three days, Hiawatha rose on the morning of the fourth and purified himself in the cold, clear waters of the lake. Then he asked the great council to assemble.

 

When the Sachems, elders, and wise men had seated themselves in a circle around the sacred fire, Hiawatha came before them and said: "What is past is past; it is the present and the future which concern us. My children, listen well, for these are my last words to you. My time among you is drawing to an end.

 

My children, war, fear, and disunity have brought you from your villages to this sacred council fire. Facing a common danger, and fearing for the lives of your families, you have yet drifted apart, each tribe thinking and acting only for itself. Remember how I took you from one small band and nursed you up into many nations. You must reunite now and act as one. No tribe alone can withstand our savage enemies, who care nothing about the eternal law, who sweep upon us like the storms of winter, spreading death and destruction everywhere.

 

My children, listen well. Remember that you are brothers, that the downfall of one means the downfall of all. You must have one fire, one pipe, one war club.

 

Hiawatha motioned to the five tribal firekeepers to unite their fires with the big sacred council fire, and they did so. Then the Great Upholder sprinkled sacred tobacco upon the glowing embers so that its sweet fragrance enveloped the wise men sitting in the circle. He said: "Onondagas, you are a tribe of mighty warriors. Your strength is like that of a giant pine tree whose roots spread far and deep so that it can withstand any storm. Be you the protectors. You shall be the first nation.

 

Oneida, your men are famous for their wisdom. Be you the counselors of the tribes. You shall be the second nation.

 

Senca, you are swift of foot and persuasive in speech. Your men are the greatest orators among the tribes. Be you the spokesmen. You shall be the third people. Cayuga, you are the most cunning. You are the most skilled in the building and managing of canoes. Be you the guardians of our rivers. You shall be the fourth nation.

 

Mohawk, you are foremost in planting corn and beans and in building long-houses. Be you the nourishers.

 

You tribes must be like the five fingers of a warrior's hand joined in gripping the war club. Unite as one, and then your enemies will recoil before you back into the northern wastes from whence they came. Let my words sink deep into your hearts and minds. Retire now to take counsel among yourselves, and come to me tomorrow to tell me whether you will follow my advice."On the next morning the sachems and wise men of the five nations came to Hiawatha with the promise that they would from that day on be as one nation.Hiawatha rejoiced. He gathered up the dazzling white feathers which the great mystery bird of the sky had dropped and gave the plumes to the leaders of the assembled tribes."By these feathers," he said, "you shall be known as the Ako-no-shu-ne, the Iroquois."

 

Thus with the help of Hiawatha, the Great Unifier, the mighty League of the Five Nations was born, and its tribes held sway undisturbed over all the land between the great river of the west and the great sea of the east.The elders begged Hiawatha to become the chief sachem of the united tribes, but he told them: "This can never be, because I must leave you. Friends and brothers, choose the wisest women in your tribes to be the future clan mothers and peacemakers, let them turn any strife arising among you into friendship. Let your sachems be wise enough to go to such women for advice when there are disputes. Now I have finished speaking. Farewell."

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This is a beautiful thread.

I hope it continues.

Thanks for the great posts.

 

 

thank you for the kind words of encouragement , steve. the thread will continue. i realize it resonates with a small

number of folks here , but for the ones it does resonate with, it is a strong resonance.

i have been in the company of tribal elders who lamented that no one took the effort to hear their words of wisdom.

i have a different idea about this, in that i think it is becoz not too many have had access to the knowldege or folklore.

 

it has been told that Hiawatha was born to a virgin mother. his own grandmother tried to drown him in a lake.

how similar to other "legends" from other cultures?!

so, yes , even if i did not have NA blood, i would think i would like to hear about these stories from North America.

maybe the time has come to listen to echoes from our land...the wisdom and teachings of our Native American Indians.

their words are simple and their voices are soft. if we have not heard them, it will be because we have not taken

the time to listen as the access is becoming more open.

 

perhaps now is the time to open our ears and our hearts to the words of wisdom they have to say?

 

Hiawatha was the follower and companion of an even greater Immortal who is less spoken of becoz he is held in

higher reverence

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Peacemaker

 

 

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thank you for the kind words of encouragement , steve.

 

Yes Zerostao, I am listening.

 

I will speak when it is time for me to speak.

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Lakota Prayer

 

Wakan Tanka, Great Mystery,

teach me how to trust

my heart,

my mind,

my intuition,

my inner knowing,

the senses of my body,

the blessings of my spirit.

Teach me to trust these things

so that I may enter my Sacred Space

and love beyond my fear,

and thus Walk in Balance

with the passing of each glorious Sun.

 

According to the Native People, the Sacred Space

is the space between exhalation and inhalation.

To Walk in Balance is to have Heaven (spirituality)

and Earth (physicality) in Harmony.

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According to the Native People, the Sacred Space

is the space between exhalation and inhalation.

To Walk in Balance is to have Heaven (spirituality)

and Earth (physicality) in Harmony.

 

Sounds like my understanding of Taoism after reading Chuang Tzu.

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Sounds like my understanding of Taoism after reading Chuang Tzu.

IMO there are many similarities of Taoism and Native American thought.

Here is a message from Chief Dan Evehema , Eldest Elder of the Hopi.

I find some similarity here with Fu Xi and Nu Wa.

http://www.merceronline.com/Native/native09.htm

It is a somber message.

Is it that primitive peoples everywhere through their observations, experiences, and understandings

viewed their world in the same light?

"There is no Religion higher than Truth."

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IMO there are many similarities of Taoism and Native American thought.

Here is a message from Chief Dan Evehema , Eldest Elder of the Hopi.

I find some similarity here with Fu Xi and Nu Wa.

http://www.merceronline.com/Native/native09.htm

It is a somber message.

Is it that primitive peoples everywhere through their observations, experiences, and understandings

viewed their world in the same light?

"There is no Religion higher than Truth."

 

Okay. Let me say first that the root of what he spoke about is valid and I agree that it is very similar to Taoist Philosophy.

 

I do regret the condition of many NAs but I can't feel sorry for them because of many reasons, which I will not speak to here.

 

I think that even Chief Dan has been negatively influenced by the white man. I say this because of the following:

 

None of the North American NAs had a written language prior to the white man. He spoke of tablets. That's the ten commandments of the Christian religion.

 

He used the word 'religion'. They did not have a religion. They had a spirituality of life.

 

He spoke of a great flood. The NAs never had a great flood in their traditions.

 

But he is right in that, when we lose our roots, we lose our traditional way of life. Many have adopted the ways of the white man. I will not pass judgement on this.

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Algonquin Flood Myth

An Algonquin Legend

The god Michabo was hunting with his pack of trained wolves one day when he saw the strangest sight, the wolves entered a lake and disappeared. He followed them into the water to fetch them and as he did so, the entire world flooded.

 

Michabo then sent forth a raven to find some soil with which to make a new earth, but the bird returned unsuccessful in its quest.

 

Then Michabo sent an otter to do the same thing, but again to no avail.

 

Finally he sent the muskrat and she brought him back enough earth to begin the reconstruction of the world. The trees had lost their branches in the flood, so Michabo shot magic arrows at them that immediately became new branches covered with leaves.

 

Then Michabo married the muskrat and they became the parents of the human race.

 

"He spoke of a great flood. The NAs never had a great flood in their traditions."

The rest of your post Marblehead, I am about 90% in agreement with.

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Not really accurate that there was no written language anywhere in the Americas. The Ojibwe (Anishnabeg), had written language on Birch bark, they jut didn't tell the white man about it, initially:

 

 

Wiigwaasabak (Ojibwe language, plural: wiigwaasabakoon) are birch bark scrolls, on which the Ojibwa (Anishinaabe) people of North America wrote complex geometrical patterns and shapes. When used specifically for Midewiwin ceremonial use, these scrolls are called mide-wiigwaas. These writings enabled the memorization of complex ideas, and passing along history and stories to succeeding generations. Several such scrolls are in museums, including one on display at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, DC. One recent study of a few scrolls details the complex math and memorizing scheme associated with the symbols that were used long ago.[citation needed] The complex writings also include astronomy, rituals, mapping, family lineage, songs, and migration routes. In addition to birchbark, copper and slate may have also been used, along with hides, pottery, and other artifacts. Some archaeologists are presently trying to determine the exact origins, dates, and locations of their use. Many scrolls were hidden away in caves and underground man-made pits.

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiigwaasabak

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Algonquin Flood Myth

An Algonquin Legend

The god Michabo was hunting with his pack of trained wolves one day when he saw the strangest sight, the wolves entered a lake and disappeared. He followed them into the water to fetch them and as he did so, the entire world flooded.

 

Michabo then sent forth a raven to find some soil with which to make a new earth, but the bird returned unsuccessful in its quest.

 

Then Michabo sent an otter to do the same thing, but again to no avail.

 

Finally he sent the muskrat and she brought him back enough earth to begin the reconstruction of the world. The trees had lost their branches in the flood, so Michabo shot magic arrows at them that immediately became new branches covered with leaves.

 

Then Michabo married the muskrat and they became the parents of the human race.

 

I stand corrected. Michabo? Sounds pretty Anglo to me. I don't think any of the NAs spoke of "gods" before white man arrived. They spoke of spirits.

 

I think someone was smoking too much locoweed.

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