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Hello. For the last few days I have been practicing Kum Nye. It is a phenomenal workout unike anything else. Does anybody here have experience with this? If so please share... More specifically, does anybody have experience with the Bon Kum Nye popularised by Stephanie Wright in her book 'Kum Nye' waking up for beginners?

Edited by Teddy

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It's a nice practice all by itself. It's also great when coupled with Vajra practices of other types too. It's nice that you're doing it!

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Hello. For the last few days I have been practicing Kum Nye. It is a phenomenal workout unike anything else. Does anybody here have experience with this? If so please share... More specifically, does anybody have experience with the Bon Kum Nye popularised by Stephanie Wright in her book 'Kum Nye' waking up for beginners?

 

Yep. Did this for at least 6 months some years back. A large part of me still feels very much drawn to the set of postures... they brought so many benefits! But, boy, are they tough!! :)

 

Here's a short list of some of the benefits I experienced:

 

- opening of the throat chakra

- opening of the leg channels; this resulted in being lighter on my feet yet more grounded at the same time

- better sleep

- improved mood

- clearer vision; brighter colours, more detail, etc.

 

Keep up your practice and you will see the benefits for yourself :)

 

Love, light and life,

James

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James why did you stop? What do you practise now? Do the postures get easier?

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I've thought learning it to get to odiyan and was exposed to it in Berkeley. I understand Kum Nye is about flying.

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Does Kum Nye have any of the same mental/physical benefits as qigong? Does it have any different benefits? I have never heard or read anything about flying... maybe that is another type of Kum Nye? Vajhridaya, what are vajra practices, and what other types are ther? Thankyou all for all of your help.

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Here are a few other resources on Kum Nye. They are not from the Bon lineage that you mention, I couldn't find much on that one:

 

Kum Nye Yoga from Tarthang Tulku (Nyingma)

 

Dzogchen Long-De from Khandro Dechen (Dzogchen)

 

What is Ku Nye? from International Academy for Traditional Tibetan Medicine

 

Ku Nye Tibetan Massage DVD from Shang Shung Institute (Namkhai Norbu)

 

Also:

 

not Kum Nye, but another Tibetan yoga, taught by Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche, a Bon teacher in Virginia.

 

Based on the little bit I've seen about it, it does look like the Kum Nye exercises share some of the same objectives as qigong or hatha yoga for that matter. The terminology is different though (winds, drops , etc).

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James why did you stop? What do you practise now? Do the postures get easier?

 

I currently practice sufi meditation, jurus and KAP's qigong set.

 

I'm glad you asked me why I stopped :) the main reason for stopping was the noise I would make when in what I think is the third posture - lion's roar (that's from memory... The one where you stand upright, with the arms up and breathe out through the mouth). I was living with flat mates at the time and, other than being somewhat self-conscious, I didn't want to wake them!! Also, at the time I was very much experimenting with spiritual practices and a regular bum on the forum. I've now settled on my practices and frankly can't fit any more in my day!

 

It's a truly awesome practice though and I do miss that spring in my step :) and, yes, the postures get easier. I remember it would be easy one day and difficult the next - it really sorts out energetic problems as well as muscle tension.

 

You're doing well :) keep it up!

 

Love,

James

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Yanta is the practice of proportions and drawing sacred images. Tat tvam asi

 

Kum nye seems to have been explained above.

 

Why I say that Kum nye is related to flying is due to a visit to the Nyingma center in Berkeley. While on pilgrimage to Odiyan I stopped in to get some directions and attended a single class. The devotee that was teaching was giving out flying postures. I found them to be very similar on that day to the nei-gung that Max had created while teaching the Kun lun lightning forms. Which I haven't played with much since I no longer meditate in the pyramid.

 

The postures were similar on that day but the yoga in the link above is something else. Which shows that Heaven is something that will adapt to the quest that the pilgrim is on.

 

The difference is due to mastery of Intent.

 

So does Intent reside in the heart or the mind?

 

Tatvam and That...anybody remember?

 

Sarva Deva Tatvam! All Gods are That!

 

Dhruve tat shunyata! Examine that emptiness!

 

Nama in Omaha

 

Is he blind currently?

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Yantra is the practice of proportions and drawing sacred images. Kum nye seems to have been explained above.

 

 

You are talking about Yantra Yoga in Hinduism, or what is called Mandala in Buddhism. In Buddhism the Yantra Yoga that we are talking about here has to do with body postures and breathing techniques.

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So does Intent reside in the heart or the mind?

 

The heart and the mind should not be considered different in the end result. But the mind should reside in the heart. Even though according to more Buddhist speech, the heart is a manifestation of mind. Of course in Buddhism, mind doesn't just mean the brain, or the part that thinks, but really just creative potential of an individual or even better the energy of an individual is their mind.

Edited by Vajrahridaya

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In the beginning it is stated that this sadhana is the art of Union of Sun and Moon as presented by Vairocana.

AS such it would fall into the category of Hatha yoga that introduces the idea of the masters vows. The vows of using vajra and bell are the primary focus of the buddha family of Vairocana and are the masters ows.

 

As for the asana that are presented in the this sadhana... they give the artist something to work with. Yantra is the practice of drawing sacred images. These images directly relate to the asana and through these postures the artist is able to express divine joy.

 

Study the meanings of the asana to find further knowledge. The conch shell is the center channel. What is a camel doing with a turtle? Where is it possible to see those two animals together? Perhaps along the silk road?

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Seems that Kum Nye is a massage healing modality. Perhaps similar to Tuina. Yantra Yoga is similar to Hatha Yoga and Qi Gong. Not sure how you can do Kum Nye yourself.. seems like it has to be done to you as a hands on massage therapy.

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Seems that Kum Nye is a massage healing modality. Perhaps similar to Tuina. Yantra Yoga is similar to Hatha Yoga and Qi Gong. Not sure how you can do Kum Nye yourself.. seems like it has to be done to you as a hands on massage therapy.

 

There seems to be various forms of Kum Nye Michaelz. The more yogic style and the more massage style. Both have the same goal but heal through different avenues.

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Chapter 1

The Camel Filling the sun and moon channels. As well as blessing those on a caravan it helps Mongolian shamans to keep the good times going.

 

The Conch The center channel, this is correlated directly to kalachakra teachings on stillness.

 

The Flame The inner heat that arises during yogic practice. This asana is most likely in the padmasana branch.

 

The Turtle This asana connects to the practice of elemental divination that uses the tortoise shell.

 

The Plough Some Heruka in the nyingma thangka's are depicted with the plough as an implement. The asana is simple enough.

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Just wondering if anyone still practices this system? I had the book some time ago but didn't stick with the practice. What sort of effects do you see long term?

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Resurrecting an old thread, if anyone else has the book and is looking for a follow-along video, I spotted this on YouTube.

 

 

Would think you would need to have the book still, as there are specific breathing patterns for each exercise, but its nice to see the movements in a video format.

 

Might give this a try tomorrow. Was something I encountered a long time ago which I never got around to practicing with any regularity.

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I practiced from the Stephanie Wright book for a long time and also felt real value.

I got away from it in favor of more meditation time but I think I'll try to get back to it.

Lately it feels like my body needs something more.

I'll take a look at the video when time allows.

Thanks!

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There’s a final posture she omits at the end, interesting. Wright recommended lying on one side, I think right side for men, at the conclusion. The book is excellent.

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23 hours ago, steve said:

There’s a final posture she omits at the end, interesting. Wright recommended lying on one side, I think right side for men, at the conclusion. The book is excellent.

 

Good to know, thanks. I've reordered the book from Amazon as I think I loaned out my old copy a while ago. Once its here, I think I'll just use that and a countdown timer to practice, rather than this video, as the music is terrible.

 

I'm not hugely familiar with the Kum Nye taught by Tarthang Tulku, but this seems to be a different system.

 

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