Jump to content


Photo

The Five Mantras


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 dontknwmucboutanythng

dontknwmucboutanythng

    Dao Bum

  • Junior Bum
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 18 April 2017 - 07:59 PM

Hello,

 

I am not sure if this is the right sub-forum for this question.  If not, moderator please move to appropriate forum, thank you.

 

Is it o.k to recite these five mantras regularly without being initiated?  “om lam”, “om tsilam”,“om mani padme hum”, “om tseli tsuli tsunti soha” and “bo lam”?

 

Many thanks.


  • Kar3n said thanks for this

#2 qicat

qicat

    simple plain cat

  • The Dao Bums
  • Pip
  • 361 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:as above so below
  • Interests:Studying Medical Qigong.

    ...I am a very practical scientific cat... I read theory only after I experience it on my own neck... I wish I could tell you I do it because I "seek" something, but the honest answer is I am just curious...

Posted 19 April 2017 - 07:00 AM

Do you know what does each mean and what does it do? 


  • OldSaint said thanks for this

#3 OldSaint

OldSaint

    Dao Bum

  • The Dao Bums
  • Pip
  • 4529 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Miami, Florida
  • Interests:Practice

Posted 19 April 2017 - 07:46 AM

You gotta give some context to your question bro. What do the mantras mean, there supposed effects, the tradition they come from, the deity there attached to....etc


  • rex said thanks for this

#4 dontknwmucboutanythng

dontknwmucboutanythng

    Dao Bum

  • Junior Bum
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 20 April 2017 - 03:21 PM

Well,  I can't say I truly understand the full meaning of each one of them.  There are multiple definitions (from a variety of web pages) for each, particularly the third one.  There are web pages that I read about their lineage and associated deity, Buddha, etc.  These are the five essential dharanis of secret (or esoteric or vajrayana I think) Buddhism.  To date my belief in the "supernatural" (for lack of better term)  world of God, Buddha, Deities, Saints, Reincarnation, etc is based on hope and faith.  I have read and heard from others that this supernatural world is as real as this physical one.  I am hoping by reciting these mantras,  I would experience/see something that would convert hope/faith into knowledge.

 

Many thanks.



#5 Sudhamma

Sudhamma

    Dao Bum

  • The Dao Bums
  • Pip
  • 125 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Singapore
  • Interests:Practise and teach 'San Pan Gong', Taiji Longivity Ruler, Baqua Roushenggong, and Ma (Yungsheng)-style Taijiquan.

Posted 21 April 2017 - 12:53 AM

There is another way of converting faith/hope to knowledge. Instead of chanting mantras and trust that deities will empower you with knowledge, why not enrol into a Buddhist sunday class? Just my suggestion. Unless of course if the knowledge you are seeking cannot be found in the Buddha-Dhamma as contained in the Tipitaka.


Edited by Sudhamma, 21 April 2017 - 12:56 AM.


#6 OldSaint

OldSaint

    Dao Bum

  • The Dao Bums
  • Pip
  • 4529 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Miami, Florida
  • Interests:Practice

Posted 21 April 2017 - 03:29 AM

Well,  I can't say I truly understand the full meaning of each one of them.  There are multiple definitions (from a variety of web pages) for each, particularly the third one.  There are web pages that I read about their lineage and associated deity, Buddha, etc.  These are the five essential dharanis of secret (or esoteric or vajrayana I think) Buddhism.  To date my belief in the "supernatural" (for lack of better term)  world of God, Buddha, Deities, Saints, Reincarnation, etc is based on hope and faith.  I have read and heard from others that this supernatural world is as real as this physical one.  I am hoping by reciting these mantras,  I would experience/see something that would convert hope/faith into knowledge.

 

Many thanks.

 

 

What your saying essentially is that you wan't your reality broken and you want to "Know" that there is another side correct? This can be a painful and terrifying process.....you sure that's something you want? In a way life can be much easier living with your head in the sand. 


Edited by OldSaint, 21 April 2017 - 04:51 AM.


#7 dontknwmucboutanythng

dontknwmucboutanythng

    Dao Bum

  • Junior Bum
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 22 April 2017 - 07:30 AM

Yes Sudhamma,  at some point I am sure I need to find a teacher/school to learn in-depth.  The problem is to find authentic school especially teacher with authentic knowledge and lineage.  I don’t even know how to differentiate the charlatan from the real.

 

Yes OldSaint.  Would you mind elaborate on the “…terrifying process…” part?  I read in one of the posting of another thread that one needs to have “…big balls…” to practice the “art”.  The only time I wouldn’t want to know about this other realities is the process involved minute ceremonial details (such as forming an incorrect mudra, mispronounce a syllable of a certain mantra, forget to bow X times, etc)  discipline that if I mess up, a bad guy/spirit would get me or bring harm to my family or something.  Anyway, please elaborate on the “…terrifying process…” part.

 

Thanks again.



#8 thelerner

thelerner

    Been here long enough to know better

  • Concierge
  • Pip
  • 10034 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:chicago
  • Interests:Getting Closer to Fine
    W/out going too Crazy

Posted 22 April 2017 - 11:16 AM

My first experience with kotodama, sacred sounds was Japanese, Old style Shinto stuff, from Aikido.  It's founder, Morihei Ueshiba was a mystic who felt great power from chanting the vowels.  There's a whole formal system.   I later learned some Kaballic systems for chanting and felt it had much in common with Shinto.  The book Ecstatic Kabbalah explores how and where sounds hit and stimulate your body.

 

I've been to an Ashram or two, and in the morning and afternoon there is much singing and chanting.  It's fun.  Initially, the meanings are a bit of a turn off, ie we revere the blue skinned, 6 armed..  but personally I don't focus on it.  Rather my enjoyment is harmonizing with the other voices, feeling the power and serenity there. 

 

Its good to know the meaning of the chant, but if you subscribe to there religion, then you should able to enjoy the chant as sacred sound, or (a little blasphemy but who cares) interpret the chant, symbolically in your own fashion, ie he says Krishna, I interpret, God, or the Universe or Loving force etc.,  

 

Course if you subscribe to the religion, then best to follow its rules a little closer and more accurately.  To higher ups these are specific messages to there Holy Incarnates.   Which is why ultimately it's not a bad idea to find a chant that has proper meaning for you.  I've settled with Rawn Clark hermetic YHVH canticle as my go to.    


Push hard to get better, become smarter, grow your devotion to the truth, fuel your commitment to beauty, refine your emotional intelligence, hone your dreams, negotiate with your shadow, cure your ignorance, shed your pettiness, heighten your drive to look for the best in people, and soften your heart. A creed from Pronoia

Where we have stopped dancing, singing, being enchanted by stories, or finding comfort in silence is where we have experience the loss of soul. Dancing, singing, storytelling, and silence are the four universal healing salves. ~ Gabrielle Roth

#9 Sudhamma

Sudhamma

    Dao Bum

  • The Dao Bums
  • Pip
  • 125 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Singapore
  • Interests:Practise and teach 'San Pan Gong', Taiji Longivity Ruler, Baqua Roushenggong, and Ma (Yungsheng)-style Taijiquan.

Posted 23 April 2017 - 01:48 AM

Hi Dontknwaboutanything, again this is just my personal take. There are two ways to get basic knowledge: 1. read up. And by this, start by reading Buddhist books that provide the basic information, and from there progress to more complex matters. There are two books that got me started, and they were written by Christmas Humprey. The books, "Buddhism" and "Buddhist Sutras" are paper-backs (Penguin?). You won't go far wrong with that approach unless you start with the deep end.  2. join a Buddhist temple that provide sunday classes, and you will not find any charlatans in those places. Start by joining a Theravaden Buddhist temple, Sri Lankan, Burmese or Thai as they will start by teaching basic stuff; stuff that was taught by the Buddha. In those places, besides being energetic (perform pujas and you are expected to help around), intellectual (you are expected to read and attend classes/lectures and even obtain a diploma in Buddhist studies), there are meditation classes, where you will be taught basic meditation techniques. The lineage? Shakyamuni Buddha, should be good enough isn't it?


Edited by Sudhamma, 23 April 2017 - 01:52 AM.


#10 OldSaint

OldSaint

    Dao Bum

  • The Dao Bums
  • Pip
  • 4529 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Miami, Florida
  • Interests:Practice

Posted 23 April 2017 - 03:50 AM

 

Yes OldSaint.  Would you mind elaborate on the “…terrifying process…” part?  I read in one of the posting of another thread that one needs to have “…big balls…” to practice the “art”.  The only time I wouldn’t want to know about this other realities is the process involved minute ceremonial details (such as forming an incorrect mudra, mispronounce a syllable of a certain mantra, forget to bow X times, etc)  discipline that if I mess up, a bad guy/spirit would get me or bring harm to my family or something.  Anyway, please elaborate on the “…terrifying process…” part.

 

Thanks again.

 

 

The path is highly challenging and transformative....thus at times it is not overly comfortable. Especially when you want to start off with a bang and abruptly shift your reality as you seem to have a desire to do. Should you have a desire to manifest methods for yourself or desire to "know" the deeper qualities of reality here is a method. 

 

1. Create a prayer that reflects your spiritual intent.

2. Then perform a 7 day water fast with that prayer 

 

-This will get you results quickly, i guarantee it. 


Edited by OldSaint, 23 April 2017 - 03:52 AM.

  • Vajra Fist said thanks for this

#11 Vajra Fist

Vajra Fist

    Dao Bum

  • The Dao Bums
  • Pip
  • 171 posts
  • Gender:None Selected

Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:42 PM

Each mantra is associated with a Buddha or Boddhisattva. Chose one, stick to it. Aim to recite it a million times. My personal recommendation is om mani padme hum, associated with Avalokitesvara (Guan Yin, Chenrezig).

It is one of the most widely maintained mantras in Asia, yet is one of the most powerful. Because Guan Yin is the 'one who hears thr cries of the world', if your heart and intention is pure you will experience immediate benefits.

It can open your heart, lift your spirit, deepen your meditation. Because of the great compassion of the deity associated with the mantra, you cannot experience any ill effects from it, as long as you have a modicum of respect (not chanting while using a toilet, for instance - but even then).

I would describe it as a panacea.

I practice Pure Land, so my focus is on reciting the name of Amitabha, but I still maintain the mani mantra when I can because of its power and beauty.

Best of luck

Edited by Vajra Fist, 25 April 2017 - 09:49 PM.


#12 words

words

    Dao Bum

  • The Dao Bums
  • Pip
  • 49 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 25 April 2017 - 10:27 PM

Is it o.k to recite these five mantras regularly without being initiated?  “om lam”, “om tsilam”,“om mani padme hum”, “om tseli tsuli tsunti soha” and “bo lam”?

 

Many thanks.

 

It's ok to do whatever you feel inspired to do. there is no universal path.

 

Don't overthink it. If you feel like reciting them, do. They/some might stick with you, they/some might fall off. Things have a way of coming in and out of our life naturally. we just like to think that we're doing all of it, that we somehow control life.


  • Vajra Fist said thanks for this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users